Wandering Greeks

The Ancient Greek Diaspora from the Age of Homer to the Death of Alexander the Great

Author: Robert Garland

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400850258

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 1310

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Most classical authors and modern historians depict the ancient Greek world as essentially stable and even static, once the so-called colonization movement came to an end. But Robert Garland argues that the Greeks were highly mobile, that their movement was essential to the survival, success, and sheer sustainability of their society, and that this wandering became a defining characteristic of their culture. Addressing a neglected but essential subject, Wandering Greeks focuses on the diaspora of tens of thousands of people between about 700 and 325 BCE, demonstrating the degree to which Greeks were liable to be forced to leave their homes due to political upheaval, oppression, poverty, warfare, or simply a desire to better themselves. Attempting to enter into the mind-set of these wanderers, the book provides an insightful and sympathetic account of what it meant for ancient Greeks to part from everyone and everything they held dear, to start a new life elsewhere—or even to become homeless, living on the open road or on the high seas with no end to their journey in sight. Each chapter identifies a specific kind of "wanderer," including the overseas settler, the deportee, the evacuee, the asylum-seeker, the fugitive, the economic migrant, and the itinerant, and the book also addresses repatriation and the idea of the "portable polis." The result is a vivid and unique portrait of ancient Greece as a culture of displaced persons.

Wandering in Ancient Greek Culture

Author: Silvia Montiglio

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226534978

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 1864

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"Examining the act of wandering through many lenses, Wandering in Ancient Greek Culture addresses questions such as: Why did the Greeks associate the figure of the wanderer with the condition of exile? How was the expansion of the world under Rome reflected in the connotations of wandering? Does a person learn by wandering, or is wandering a deviation from the truth? In the end, this matchless volume shows how the transformations that affected the figure of the wanderer coincided with new perceptions of the world and of travel, and invites us to consider its definition and import today."--BOOK JACKET.

Athens Burning

The Persian Invasion of Greece and the Evacuation of Attica

Author: Robert Garland

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421421976

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 4352

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Between June 480 and August 479 BC, tens of thousands of Athenians evacuated, following King Xerxes’ victory at the Battle of Thermopylae. Abandoning their homes and ancestral tombs in the wake of the invading Persian army, they sought refuge abroad. Women and children were sent to one safe haven, the elderly to another, while all men of military age were conscripted into the fleet. During this difficult year of exile, the city of Athens was set on fire not once, but twice. In Athens Burning, Robert Garland explores the reasons behind the decision to abandon Attica, the peninsular region of Greece that includes Athens, while analyzing the consequences, both material and psychological, of the resulting invasion. Garland introduces readers to the contextual background of the Greco-Persian wars, which include the famous Battle of Marathon. He describes the various stages of the invasion from both the Persian and Greek point of view and explores the siege of the Acropolis, the defeat of the Persians first by the allied Greek navy and later by the army, and, finally, the return of the Athenians to their land. Taking its inspiration from the sufferings of civilians, Athens Burning also works to dispel the image of the Persians as ruthless barbarians. Addressing questions that are largely ignored in other accounts of the conflict, including how the evacuation was organized and what kind of facilities were available to the refugees along the way, Garland demonstrates the relevance of ancient history to the contemporary world. This compelling story is especially resonant in a time when the news is filled with the suffering of nearly 5 million people driven by civil war from their homes in Syria. Aimed at students and scholars of ancient history, this highly accessible book will also fascinate anyone interested in the burgeoning fields of refugee and diaspora studies.

Wandering Poets in Ancient Greek Culture

Travel, Locality and Pan-Hellenism

Author: Ian Rutherford

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521898781

Category: History

Page: 313

View: 3921

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Explores the phenomenon of wandering poets, setting them within the wider context of ancient networks of exchange, patronage and affiliation.

Olympic Wandering

Time Travel Through Greece

Author: David Lundberg

Publisher: Zante Pub

ISBN: 9780976324645

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 195

View: 7829

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Combining high adventure and lush travel narrative, Olympic Wandering takes you on a journey through time. Follow Ulysses on the seldom-told tale of his life as a young king within Greece. Then travel across the centuries, exploring the spirit of a people clinging to a beautiful peninsula surrounded by sparkling islands in center of the world.

Refugees Throughout History

Searching for Safety

Author: Gary Wiener

Publisher: Greenhaven Publishing LLC

ISBN: 1534563938

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 104

View: 7028

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Refugees search for safety in new countries after they are forced to leave home, but some people are afraid of them and treat them poorly in the countries they escape to. Learning about the history of refugees increases readers' sense of empathy for those who have been left with no choice but to flee their homes. This sensitive topic is addressed through fact-filled main text and sidebars, annotated quotes, primary sources, and a thorough timeline. Refugee issues are often in the news, and this volume presents readers with the facts they need to think critically about this topic.

Greek Byways

Author: T. R. Glover

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107438497

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 1263

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Originally published in 1932, this book contains papers by the Classicist T. R. Glover on subjects pertaining to ancient Greek life.

The Antiquary

A Magazine Devoted to the Study of the Past

Author: Edward Walford,George Latimer Apperson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Archaeology

Page: N.A

View: 3038

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Ancient Greek Divination

Author: Sarah Iles Johnston

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444303007

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 5125

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The first English-language survey of ancient Greek divinatory methods, Ancient Greek Divination offers a broad yet detailed treatment of the earliest attempts by ancient Greeks to seek the counsel of the gods. Offers in-depth discussions of oracles, wandering diviners, do-it-yourself methods of foretelling the future, magical divinatory techniques, and much more Illustrates how the study of divination illuminates the mentalities of ancient Greek religions and societies

Wandering in Ancient Greek Culture

Author: Silvia Montiglio

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226534978

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 5570

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"Examining the act of wandering through many lenses, Wandering in Ancient Greek Culture addresses questions such as: Why did the Greeks associate the figure of the wanderer with the condition of exile? How was the expansion of the world under Rome reflected in the connotations of wandering? Does a person learn by wandering, or is wandering a deviation from the truth? In the end, this matchless volume shows how the transformations that affected the figure of the wanderer coincided with new perceptions of the world and of travel, and invites us to consider its definition and import today."--BOOK JACKET.

The Alexandra of Lycophron

A Literary Study

Author: Associate Professor of Classics Charles McNelis,Markos and Eleni Tsakopoulos Kounalakis Chair of Hellenic Studies Alexander Sens

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199601895

Category:

Page: 232

View: 7885

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This monograph is a literary study of Lycophron's Alexandra, whose obscurity, a quality notorious already in antiquity, has long hampered holistic approaches. Through a series of distinct but closely integrated literary studies of major aspects of the poem, including its style, its engagement with the traditions of epic and tragedy, and it's treatment of heroism and of the gods, the book explores the way the Alexandra reconfigures Greek mythology. In particular, as it is presented in Homeric epic and Athenian tragedy, in order to cast the Romans and their restoration of Trojan glory as the ultimate telos of history. In this sense, the poem emerges as an important intermediary between Homeric epic and Latin poetry, particularly Vergil's Aeneid. By rewriting specific features of the epic and tragic traditions, the Alexandra denies to Greek heroes the glory that was the traditional compensation for their suffering, while at the same time attributing to Cassandra's Trojan family honours framed in the traditional language of Greek heroism. In this sense, the figure of Cassandra, a prophetess traditionally gifted with the power of foresight but denied credibility, self-reflexively serves as a vehicle for exploring the potentials and limitations of poetry.

Wandering Poets in Ancient Greek Culture

Travel, Locality and Pan-Hellenism

Author: Ian Rutherford

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521898781

Category: History

Page: 313

View: 3334

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Explores the phenomenon of wandering poets, setting them within the wider context of ancient networks of exchange, patronage and affiliation.

Archaeologies of the Greek Past

Landscape, Monuments, and Memories

Author: Susan E. Alcock

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521890007

Category: History

Page: 222

View: 1631

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This 2002 book explores social memory in the ancient Greek world using the evidence of landscapes and monuments.

The Greek Way of Death

Author: Robert Garland

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801487460

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 1076

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Surveying funerary rites and attitudes toward death from the time of Homer to the fourth century B.C., Robert Garland seeks to show what the ordinary Greek felt about death and the dead. The Second Edition features a substantial new prefatory essay in which Garland addresses recent questions and debates about death and the early Greeks. The book also includes an updated Supplementary Bibliography. Praise for the first edition: "This [volume] contains a rich and remarkably complete collection of the abundant but scattered literary, artistic, and archaeological evidence on death in the ancient world as well as an extensive bibliography on the subject. Robert Garland conceives of death as a process, a rite of passage, a mutual but changing relationship between the deceased and [his or her] survivors. . . . A most useful collection of evidence, sensibly organized (no small feat) and lucidly presented. . . . A valuable source on the Greeks and on the always-lively subject of death."—American Historical Review "Much can be learned from this engaging survey of popular attitudes toward death, the dying, and the dead in Greece down to the end of the Classical period. . . . Appealing to scholars and the general audience."—Religious Studies Review