The Right Women: Republican Party Activists, Candidates, and Legislators

Author: Malliga Och,Shauna L. Shames

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440851638

Category: Political Science

Page: 287

View: 5299

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A powerful exploration of the role of women in the Republican Party that enhances readers' understanding of gender representation in the GOP and suggests solutions to address the partisan gender gap. • Analyzes the role of women in the Republican Party, something that must be understood if America is to achieve equal representation of women in the U.S. Congress and state governments • Fills an important gap in knowledge regarding the presence and impact of women in the Republican Party • Suggests ways members of the Republican Party can remedy the underrepresentation of women in their ranks • Brings together chapters contributed by leading experts in the field of women and politics

Sex and Gender in the 2016 Presidential Election

Author: Caroline Heldman,Meredith Conroy,Alissa R. Ackerman

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440859426

Category: Political Science

Page: 216

View: 5361

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In order to understand the motivations for and implications of Hillary Clinton's historic run for the White House— and her subsequent defeat—the authors explore sexism and gender bias in U.S. political and social culture. • Analyzes original data such as Twitter hashtags, exit polls, and other public opinion data • Goes beyond women-in-politics research to consider gender as a barrier to political equality • Describes the media's involvement in perpetuating gender stereotypes • Considers rape culture as an important aspect of both the Trump campaign and the general election

Political Women and American Democracy

Author: Christina Wolbrecht,Karen Beckwith,Lisa Baldez

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139471007

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 4545

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What do we know about women, politics, and democracy in the United States? The last thirty years have witnessed a remarkable increase in women's participation in American politics and an explosion of research on female political actors, and the transformations effected by them, during the same period. Political Women and American Democracy provides a critical synthesis of scholarly research by leading experts in the field. The collected essays examine women as citizens, voters, participants, movement activists, partisans, candidates, and legislators. The authors provide frameworks for understanding and organizing existing scholarship; focus on theoretical, methodological, and empirical debates; and map out productive directions for future research. Political Women and American Democracy is an invaluable resource for scholars and students studying and conducting women and politics research.

The Party Decides

Presidential Nominations Before and After Reform

Author: Marty Cohen,David Karol,Hans Noel,John Zaller

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226112381

Category: Political Science

Page: 416

View: 9136

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Throughout the contest for the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination, politicians and voters alike worried that the outcome might depend on the preferences of unelected superdelegates. This concern threw into relief the prevailing notion that—such unusually competitive cases notwithstanding—people, rather than parties, should and do control presidential nominations. But for the past several decades, The Party Decides shows, unelected insiders in both major parties have effectively selected candidates long before citizens reached the ballot box. Tracing the evolution of presidential nominations since the 1790s, this volume demonstrates how party insiders have sought since America’s founding to control nominations as a means of getting what they want from government. Contrary to the common view that the party reforms of the 1970s gave voters more power, the authors contend that the most consequential contests remain the candidates’ fights for prominent endorsements and the support of various interest groups and state party leaders. These invisible primaries produce frontrunners long before most voters start paying attention, profoundly influencing final election outcomes and investing parties with far more nominating power than is generally recognized.

More Women Can Run

Gender and Pathways to the State Legislatures

Author: Susan J. Carroll,Kira Sanbonmatsu

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199322449

Category: Political Science

Page: 192

View: 3943

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Women remain dramatically underrepresented in elective office, including in entry-level political offices. While they enjoy the freedom to stand for office and therefore have an equal legal footing with men, this persistent gender imbalance raises pressing questions about democratic legitimacy, the inclusivity of American politics, and the quality of political representation. The reasons for women's underrepresentation remain the subject of much debate. One explanation--that the United States lacks sufficient openings for political newcomers--has become less compelling in recent years, as states that have adopted term limits have not seen the expected gains in women's office holding. Other accounts about candidate scarcity, gender inequalities in society, and the lingering effects of gendered socialization have some merit; however, these accounts still fail to explain the relatively low numbers. Drawing upon original surveys conducted in 1981 and 2008 by the Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP) of women state legislators across all fifty states, and follow-up interviews after the 2008 survey, the authors find that gender differences in pathways to the legislatures, first evident in 1981, have been surprisingly persistent over time. They find that, while the ambition framework better explains men's decisions to run for office, a relationally embedded model of candidate emergence better captures women's decision-making, with women's decisions more often influenced by the encouragement and support of parties, organizations, and family members. By rethinking the nature of women's representation, this study calls for a reorientation of academic research on women's election to office and provides insight into new strategies for political practitioners concerned about women's political equality.

The Parties Versus the People

How to Turn Republicans and Democrats Into Americans

Author: Mickey Edwards

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300184565

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 7848

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A former congressman draws on his first-hand experience with legislative battles to present a solution-based, practical way to break the stranglehold of the political party system and banish the negative effects of partisan warfare.

Politics in the American States

A Comparative Analysis

Author: Virginia Gray,Russell L. Hanson,Thad Kousser

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: 1506363652

Category: Political Science

Page: 608

View: 1056

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Winner of the 2017 Mac Jewell Enduring Contribution Award of the APSA's State Politics and Policy Section. Politics in the American States, Eleventh Edition, brings together the high-caliber research you expect from this trusted text, with comprehensive and comparative analysis of the 50 states. Fully updated for all major developments in the study of state-level politics, including capturing the results of the 2016 elections, editors Virginia Gray, Russell L. Hanson, and Thad Kousser bring insight and uncover the impact of key similarities and differences on the operation of the same basic political systems. Students will appreciate the book’s glossary, the fully up-to-date tables and figures, and the maps showcasing comparative data.

The Tea Party and the Remaking of Republican Conservatism

Author: Theda Skocpol,Vanessa Williamson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190633662

Category: Conservatism

Page: 257

View: 7615

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In this penetrating new study, Skocpol of Harvard University, one of today's leading political scientists, and co-author Williamson go beyond the inevitable photos of protesters in tricorn hats and knee breeches to provide a nuanced portrait of the Tea Party. What they find is sometimes surprising.

Political Ambition

Who Decides to Run for Congress

Author: Linda L. Fowler,Robert D. McClure

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300049015

Category: Political Science

Page: 264

View: 7246

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How do politicians decide whether or not to run for Congress? Using extensive interviews and analyses of district data and opinion polls from New York's 30th Congressional District during the elections of 1984 and 1986, Linda Fowler and Robert McClure assess the personal and contextual factors that motivate some individuals to enter a House race and induce others to remain on the sidelines. They discuss, for example, the cost and complexity of competitive House races, the recruitment of female legislators, and the changes in American politics such as reapportionment, the redistribution of power away from Washington, and the transformation of parties and interest groups. Their book is a splendid reminder that politics is really the most human of endeavors, and nothing is more central to its human dimension than plain old ambition.-David S. Broder, Washington Post

How the Right Lost Its Mind

Author: Charles J. Sykes

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1250147174

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 8776

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Once at the center of the American conservative movement, bestselling author and radio host Charles Sykes is a fierce opponent of Donald Trump and the right-wing media that enabled his rise. In How the Right Lost Its Mind, Sykes presents an impassioned, regretful, and deeply thoughtful account of how the American conservative movement came to lose its values. How did a movement that was defined by its belief in limited government, individual liberty, free markets, traditional values, and civility find itself embracing bigotry, political intransigence, demagoguery, and outright falsehood? How the Right Lost its Mind addresses: *Why are so many voters so credulous and immune to factual information reported by responsible media? *Why did conservatives decide to overlook, even embrace, so many of Trump’s outrages, gaffes, conspiracy theories, falsehoods, and smears? *Can conservatives govern? Or are they content merely to rage? *How can the right recover its traditional values and persuade a new generation of their worth?

Navigating Gendered Terrain

Stereotypes and Strategy in Political Campaigns

Author: Kelly Dittmar

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 1439911495

Category: Political Science

Page: 230

View: 8285

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From the presidential level down, men and women who run for political office confront different electoral realities. In her probing study, Navigating Gendered Terrain, Kelly Dittmar investigates how gender influences the campaign strategy and behavior of candidates today. Concurrently, she shows how candidates' strategic and tactical decisions can influence the gendered nature of campaign institutions. Navigating Gendered Terrain addresses how gender is used to shape how campaigns are waged by influencing insider perceptions of and decisions about effective campaign messages, images, and tactics within party and political contexts. Dittmar uses survey information and interviews with candidates, political consultants, and other campaign professionals to reveal how gender-informed advertising, websites, and overall presentation to voters respond to stereotypes and perceptions of female and male candidates. She closes her book by offering a feminist interpretation of women as candidates and explaining how the unintended outcomes of political campaigns reinforce prevailing ideas about gender and candidacy.

Political Women

The Women's Movement, Political Institutions, the Battle for Women's Suffrage and the ERA

Author: Alana Jeydel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134279124

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 5015

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Under what conditions are political elites responsive to social movements, and when do social movements gain access to political elites? This book explores this question with regard to the women's movement in the US, asking under what conditions are Congress and the presidency responsive to the women's movement, and when will the women's movement gain access to Congress and the presidency? The book systematically compares the relation between political leaders and each of the three waves of the women's movement, 1848-1889, 1890-1928, and 1960-1985, in light of the political dynamics that each wave faced. The author utilizes perspectives and methods from the fields of Political Science, Sociology, and History to illustrate the ways in which changing political dynamics impacted the battle for both women's suffrage and the Equal Rights Amendment. A significant addition to the study of women's history and American studies, Political Women illlustrates the important roles that political leaders played in the battle for women's suffrage and the ERA and demonstrates the political savvy among women suffrage activists who recognized the institutional barriers present in the US political system and fought to overcome them.

A Room at a Time

How Women Entered Party Politics

Author: Jo Freeman

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780847698059

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

View: 7663

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In this important volume, Jo Freeman brings us the very full, rich story of how American women entered into political life and party politics-well before suffrage and, in many cases, completely separate from it. She shows how women carefully and methodically learned about the issues, the candidates, and the institutions, put themselves to work, and made themselves indispensable not only to the men running for office, but to the political system overall.

Unite and Conquer

How to Build Coalitions That Win and Last

Author: Kyrsten Sinema

Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers

ISBN: 9781605090054

Category: Political Science

Page: 190

View: 8088

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Old-school divide-and-conquer tactics—demonizing opponents, frightening voters, refusing to compromise—may make us feel good about the purity of our ideals, but it's no way to get anything done. Worse, this approach betrays some of the most cherished ideals of the progressive movement: inclusion, reason, justice, and hope. Illuminated by examples from her own work and a host of campaigns across the country, Kyrsten Sinema shows how to forge connections—both personal and political—with seemingly unlikely allies and define our values, interests, and objectives in ways that broaden our range of potential partners and expand our tactical options. With irreverent humor, enthralling campaign stories, and solid, practical advice, Sinema enables us to move past “politics as war” and build support for progressive causes on the foundation of our common humanity.

Messengers of the Right

Conservative Media and the Transformation of American Politics

Author: Nicole Hemmer

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812248392

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 6909

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Messengers of the Right tells the story of the media activists who built the American conservative movement and transformed it into one of the most significant and successful movements of the twentieth century—and in the process remade the Republican Party and the American media landscape.

Gender and Elections

Shaping the Future of American Politics

Author: Susan J. Carroll,Richard L. Fox

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108278582

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 8457

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The fourth edition of Gender and Elections offers a systematic, lively, multi-faceted account of the role of gender in the electoral process through the 2016 elections. This timely, yet enduring, volume strikes a balance between highlighting the most important development for women as voters and candidates in the 2016 elections and providing a more long-term, in-depth analysis of the ways in which gender has helped shape the contours and outcomes of electoral politics in the United States. Individual chapters demonstrate the importance of gender in understanding and interpreting presidential elections, voter participation and turnout, voting choices, congressional elections, the participation of African American women, the support of political parties and women's organizations, candidate communications with voters, and state elections. Without question, Gender and Elections is the most comprehensive, reliable, and trustworthy resource on the role of gender in electoral politics.

Red State Uprising

How to Take Back America

Author: Erick Erickson,Lew Uhler

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1596981628

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 2004

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Fed up with our arrogant federal government? Don’t want massive programs we don’t need and can’t afford? Then join the Red State Uprising! In his new book, RedState.com founder Erick Erickson clearly outlines what needs to change in Washington and what we can do locally to make it happen. Red State Uprising is not about anarchy or a revolution—it’s about reshaping government to maximize economic growth, individual liberty and private property rights.

Out of the Running

Why Millennials Reject Political Careers and Why It Matters

Author: Shauna L. Shames

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479853569

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 8432

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An inside look into why Millennials are rejecting careers in politics, and what this means for the future of America's political system Millennials are often publically criticized for being apathetic about the American political process and their lack of interest in political careers. But what do millennials themselves have to say about the prospect of holding political office? Are they as uninterested in political issues and the future of the American political system as the media suggests? Out of the Running goes directly to the source and draws from extensive research, including over 50 interviews, with graduate students in elite institutions that have historically been a direct link for their graduates into state or federal elected office: Harvard Law, Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and Boston’s Suffolk University Law School. Shauna Shames, herself a young graduate of Harvard University, suggests that millennials are not uninterested; rather, they don’t believe that a career in politics is the best way to create change. Millennials view the system as corrupt or inefficient and are particularly skeptical about the fundraising, frenzied media attention, and loss of privacy that have become staples of the American electoral process. They are clear about their desire to make a difference in the world but feel that the “broken” political system is not the best way to do so—a belief held particularly by millennial women and women of color. The implications of Shames’ argument are crucial for the future of the American political system—how can a system adapt and grow if qualified, intelligent leaders are not involved? An engaging and accessible resource for anyone who follows American politics, Out of the Running highlights the urgent need to fix the American political system, as an absence of diverse millennial candidates leaves its future in a truly precarious position. Instructor's Guide

The Right Path

From Ike to Reagan, How Republicans Once Mastered Politics--and Can Again

Author: Joe Scarborough

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0812996151

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 4383

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Joe Scarborough—former Republican congressman and the always insightful host of MSNBC’s Morning Joe—takes a nuanced and surprising look at the unexpected rise and self-inflicted fall of the Republican Party. Dominant in national politics for forty years under the influence of the conservative but pragmatic leadership of Dwight Eisenhower and Ronald Reagan, the GOP, Scarborough argues, is in a self-inflicted eclipse. The only way forward? Recover the principled realism of the giants who led the party to greatness. In the aftermath of Lyndon Johnson’s 1964 landslide, the Republican Party appeared to be on the verge of permanent irrelevance. LBJ’s Great Society was institutionalizing sweeping liberal reforms, and the United States had a thriving, prosperous economy. Yet in an instant everything changed, and the next four decades would witness an unprecedented era of Republican ascendancy. What happened? In The Right Path, Joe Scarborough looks back in time to discern how Republicans once dominated American public life. From Eisenhower’s refusal to let “the perfect be the enemy of the good” to Reagan’s charismatic but resolutely practical genius, Scarborough shows how principled pragmatism, combined with a commitment to core conservative values, led to victory after victory. Now, however, political incalcitrance is threatening to turn a once-mighty party into a permanent minority. Opening with the passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965—the high-water moment for liberalism—and ending with the national disillusionment that set in after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans, The Right Path effortlessly blends American political history with astute analysis and pithy, no-holds-barred commentary. Both a bracing call to arms and a commonsense history, The Right Path provides an illuminating look at conservatism and its discontents—and why the GOP must regain its former tone and tradition if it hopes to survive. Praise for The Right Path “This concise history of modern Republican politics might just leave you optimistic about the chances that conservatives can govern again. . . . In the world of commentary, we tend to obsess over the quotidian ebbs and flows—assuming that every little bump in the road is a disaster. . . . But there’s something about reading the history that allows one to take a longer view and put things in context. And that’s precisely what this book does very well.”—The Daily Caller “The Right Path is the right book at the right time to spark a much-needed conversation about the future of the Republican Party.”—Doris Kearns Goodwin “If you’re interested in the Republican future, you need to read The Right Path. I don’t agree with all of it, but Joe Scarborough has written a book that’s both thought-provoking and fun.”—William Kristol “Joe Scarborough’s lively, provocative, and instructive history of the modern Republican Party will stir up the GOP—which is exactly what he has in mind. As the Grand Old Party searches for a path to victory, Joe offers some important lessons to be learned.”—Tom Brokaw “Joe Scarborough’s incisive, original, provocative, and well-argued book, deploying American political history both distant and recent, deserves to be widely read, carefully considered, and energetically debated.”—Michael Beschloss From the Hardcover edition.

American Maelstrom

The 1968 Election and the Politics of Division

Author: Michael Cohen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019977756X

Category: Presidents

Page: 496

View: 5256

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In his presidential inaugural address of January 1965, Lyndon Johnson offered an uplifting vision for America, one that would end poverty and racial injustice. Elected in a landslide over the conservative Republican Barry Goldwater and bolstered by the so-called liberal consensus, economic prosperity, and a strong wave of nostalgia for his martyred predecessor, John Kennedy, Johnson announced the most ambitious government agenda in decades. Three years later, everything had changed. Johnson's approval ratings had plummeted; the liberal consensus was shattered; the war in Vietnam splintered the nation; and the politics of civil rights had created a fierce white backlash. A report from the National Committee for an Effective Congress warned of a "national nervous breakdown." The election of 1968 was immediately caught up in a swirl of powerful forces, and the nine men who sought the nation's highest office that year attempted to ride them to victory-or merely survive them. On the Democratic side, Eugene McCarthy energized the anti-war movement; George Wallace spoke to the working-class white backlash; Robert Kennedy took on the mantle of his slain brother. Entangled in Vietnam, Johnson, stunningly, opted not to run again, scrambling the odds. On the Republican side, 1968 saw the vindication of Richard Nixon, who outhustled Nelson Rockefeller, Ronald Reagan and George Romney, by navigating between the conservative and moderate wings of the Republican Party. The assassinations of first Martin Luther King, Jr., and then Kennedy seemed to push the country to the brink of chaos, a chaos reflected in the Democratic Convention in Chicago, a televised horror show. Vice President Hubert Humphrey emerged as the nominee, and, finally liberating himself from Johnson's grip, nearly overcame the lead long enjoyed by Nixon who, by exploiting division and channeling the national yearning for order, would be the last man standing. In American Maelstrom, Michael A. Cohen captures the full drama of this watershed election, establishing 1968 as the hinge between the decline of political liberalism, the ascendancy of conservative populism, and the rise of anti-government attitudes that continue to dominate the nation's political discourse. In this sweeping and immersive book, equal parts compelling analysis and thrilling narrative, Cohen takes us to the very source of our modern politics of division.