The Forest Service and the Greatest Good

A Centennial History

Author: James G. Lewis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780890300664

Category: Nature

Page: 286

View: 6215

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America's oldest and largest federal land management agency—the Forest Service—is examined from its roots in the 1800s to present day in this illustrated history. As exemplified by the endless interpretations of the "greatest good"—as it first applied to timber, grazing, and watershed protection and later included recreation, wilderness, wildlife, and eventually the consideration of ecosystem management—this is the story of the myriad conflicts that have pitted America's primary land-management agency against the President. By documenting the establishment of the National Forest System and subsequent conservation policies, the work profiles the numerous men and women working as Forest Service agents in the National Forest System who are dedicated to researching and developing new ways of addressing the conflicts over natural resources management on the 193 million acres of federal land. The book is the companion to the documentary film The Greatest Good: A Centennial History of the Forest Service.

The Forest Service and the Greatest Good

A Centennial History

Author: James G. Lewis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780890300664

Category: Nature

Page: 286

View: 9953

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America's oldest and largest federal land management agency—the Forest Service—is examined from its roots in the 1800s to present day in this illustrated history. As exemplified by the endless interpretations of the "greatest good"—as it first applied to timber, grazing, and watershed protection and later included recreation, wilderness, wildlife, and eventually the consideration of ecosystem management—this is the story of the myriad conflicts that have pitted America's primary land-management agency against the President. By documenting the establishment of the National Forest System and subsequent conservation policies, the work profiles the numerous men and women working as Forest Service agents in the National Forest System who are dedicated to researching and developing new ways of addressing the conflicts over natural resources management on the 193 million acres of federal land. The book is the companion to the documentary film The Greatest Good: A Centennial History of the Forest Service.

The U.S. Forest Service

A Centennial History

Author: Harold K. Steen

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295803487

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 372

View: 2027

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The U.S. History Service: The Retirement Association at the University of Washington

Pattern of the Land

The Search for Home in an Altered Landscape

Author: Eileen Apperson

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 1469782219

Category: Nature

Page: 152

View: 2539

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Eileen Apperson has always felt a visceral reaction to landscapes. The one she lives in has been compromised and altered, making her relationship to this place all the more complicated. The San Joaquin Valley has gone through series of transitions to become the worlds greatest agricultural region. To reach such status, the land has gone through sweeping alterations over the past 150 years. This has been due to a series of events brought about by missionaries, trappers, cattlemen famers, and finally a growing urban population. Pattern of the Land explores each of these stages in the valley's history by describing the uniqueness of its terrain. What brings this recorder upon the land closer is that the most significant of these changes have come at the hands of her family, the first settlers in a frontier. Pattern of the Land weaves family stories with historic accounts, focusing primarily on the region where the Kings River descends the Sierra to the area that was Tulare Lake. These sketches guide her search fit home in an altered landscape. Family has been one constant in the place she has grown to appreciate and is now proud to call home.

The U.S. Forest Service in the Pacific Northwest

A History

Author: Gerald W. Williams

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 7623

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The Northwest has been at the forefront of forest management and research in the United States for more than one hundred years. In The U.S. Forest Service in the Pacific Northwest, Gerald Williams provides an historical overview of the part the Forest Service has played in managing the Northwest's forests. Emphasizing changes in management policy over the years, Williams discusses the establishment of the national forests in Oregon and Washington, grazing on public land, the Great Depression, World War II, and the rise of multiple-use management policies. He draws on extensive documentation of the post-war development boom to explore its effects on forests and Forest Service workers. Discussing such controversial issues as roadless areas and wilderness designation; timber harvesting; forest planning; ecosystems; and spotted owls, Williams demonstrates the impact of 1970s environmental laws on national forest management. The book is rich in photographs, many drawn from the Gerald W. Williams Collection, housed in University Archives at Oregon State University Libraries. Extensive appendices provide detailed data about Pacific Northwest forests. Chronicling a century of the agency's management of almost 25 million acres of national forests and grasslands for the people of the United States, The U.S. Forest Service in the Pacific Northwest is a welcome and overdue resource.

The U.S. Forest Service

A History

Author: Harold K. Steen

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780295983738

Category: History

Page: 356

View: 9870

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The U.S. Forest Service celebrates its centennial in 2005. With a new preface by the author, this edition of Harold K. Steen’s classic history (originally published in 1976) provides a broad perspective on the Service’s administrative and policy controversies and successes. Steen updates the book with discussions of a number of recent concerns, among them the spotted owl issue; wilderness and roadless areas; new research on habitat, biodiversity, and fire prevention; below-cost timber sales; and workplace diversity in a male-oriented field.

The Forest Service

Fighting for Public Lands

Author: Gerald W. Williams

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313337949

Category: Nature

Page: 459

View: 3923

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Illuminates the Forest Service and its responsibilites of managing 193 millions acres of public land.

The Greatest Good

100 Years of Forestry in America

Author: Char Miller,Rebecca Staebler

Publisher: Society Amer Foresters

ISBN: N.A

Category: Nature

Page: 125

View: 1991

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The Forest Ranger

A Study in Administrative Behavior

Author: Herbert Kaufman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136524444

Category: Political Science

Page: 312

View: 2803

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It is the rare book that remains in print for nearly fifty years, earning wide acclaim as a classic. The Forest Ranger has been essential reading for generations of professionals and scholars in forestry, public administration, and organizational behavior who are interested in the administration of public lands and how the top managers of a large, dispersed organization with multiple objectives like the Forest Service shape the behavior of its field officers into a coherent, unified program. Published as a special reprint in conjunction with the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Forest Service, The Forest Ranger is as relevant and timely today as when it was first issued in 1960. In addition to the original text, this special reprint of The Forest Ranger includes two new forewords and an afterword that highlight how much we have learned from Herbert Kaufman. The first foreword, by Harold K. (Pete) Steen, former president of the Forest History Society, considers the book's impact on the forestry community and explains its continued relevance in light of changes in the culture and mission of today's Forest Service. The second, by Richard P. Nathan, co-director of the Rockefeller Institute of Government, considers the book's contribution to our understanding of administrative and organizational behavior. A new afterword by author Herbert Kaufman describes how his landmark study came into being and offers a candid assessment of how his theories about the agency's operations and its future have held up over time. In 1960, the Forest Service had a welldeserved reputation for excellence, and The Forest Ranger was a seminal analysis of the how's and why's of its success. Kaufman also warned, however, that an organization so unified and well adapted to its environment would have difficulties navigating social change. He was right in his concerns: The environmental, civil rights, and women's movements have all presented challenges to the character and purpose of the Forest Service, ultimately changing the organization in subtle and not-so-subtle ways. Now, as then, The Forest Ranger is a striking and prescient case study of how a complex organization operates and evolves over time.

The American People and the National Forests

The First Century of the U.S. Forest Service

Author: Samuel P. Hays

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre

ISBN: 0822973545

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 2576

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The year 2005 marked the centennial of the founding of the United States Forest Service (USFS). Samuel P. Hays uses this occasion to present a cogent history of the role of American society in shaping the policies and actions of this agency. From its establishment in 1905 under the auspices of the Department of Agriculture, timber and grazing management dominated the agency's agenda. Due to high consumer demand for wood products and meat from livestock, the USFS built a formidable system of forest managers, training procedures, and tree science programs to specifically address these needs. This strong internal organization bolstered the agency during the tumultuous years in the final one-third of the century—when citizens and scientists were openly critical of USFS policies—yet it restricted the agency's vision and adaptability on environmental issues. A dearth of ecological capabilities tormented the USFS in 1960 when the Multiple-Use and Sustained-Yield Act set new statutes for the preservation of wildlife, recreation, watershed, and aesthetic resources. This was followed by the National Forest Management Act of 1976, which established standards for the oversight of forest ecosystems. The USFS was ill equipped to handle the myriad administrative and technological complexities that these mandates required. In The American People and the National Forests, Hays chronicles three distinct periods in USFS history, provides a summarizing “legacy” for each, and outlines the public and private interests, administrators, and laws that guided the agency's course and set its priorities. He demonstrates how these legacies affected successive eras, how they continue to influence USFS policy in the twenty-first century, and why USFS policies should matter to all of us.

The Big Burn

Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire that Saved America

Author: Timothy Egan

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780547416861

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 4195

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National Book Award–winner Timothy Egan turns his historian's eye to the largest-ever forest fire in America and offers an epic, cautionary tale for our time. On the afternoon of August 20, 1910, a battering ram of wind moved through the drought-stricken national forests of Washington, Idaho, and Montana, whipping the hundreds of small blazes burning across the forest floor into a roaring inferno that jumped from treetop to ridge as it raged, destroying towns and timber in the blink of an eye. Forest rangers had assembled nearly ten thousand men to fight the fires, but no living person had seen anything like those flames, and neither the rangers nor anyone else knew how to subdue them. Egan recreates the struggles of the overmatched rangers against the implacable fire with unstoppable dramatic force, and the larger story of outsized president Teddy Roosevelt and his chief forester, Gifford Pinchot, that follows is equally resonant. Pioneering the notion of conservation, Roosevelt and Pinchot did nothing less than create the idea of public land as our national treasure, owned by every citizen. Even as TR's national forests were smoldering they were saved: The heroism shown by his rangers turned public opinion permanently in favor of the forests, though it changed the mission of the forest service in ways we can still witness today. This e-book includes a sample chapter of SHORT NIGHTS OF THE SHADOW CATCHER.

Careers in Forest, Wildlife, Fisheries, and Range Resources

Author: Ron Boldenow

Publisher: Waveland Press

ISBN: 1478637927

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 148

View: 5446

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Anyone interested in working in natural resources will benefit from this concise, practical introduction to the professions of forestry, fisheries, wildlife, and range management. Drawing on his nearly two decades of teaching, advising, and recruiting, the author helps readers transform their desire for an interesting and meaningful career into a purposeful and efficient path to obtaining the appropriate education, training, and experience. The logical organization and reader-friendly presentation orient readers to natural resources career possibilities, job descriptions and responsibilities, educational requirements, and potential employers. A chapter on the history of the conservation movement and the science of ecology adds context, while a capstone chapter offers real-world advice on topics such as interviewing, developing communication skills, acquiring field skills, and outdoor safety. Abundant photos enliven the discussions, while exercises provide opportunities for readers to explore, practice, and apply chapter content.

America's Public Lands

From Yellowstone to Smokey Bear and Beyond

Author: Randall K. Wilson

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 144220799X

Category: Nature

Page: 334

View: 2291

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How is it that the United States—the country that cherishes the ideal of private property more than any other in the world—has chosen to set aside nearly one-third of its territory as public lands? Considering this intriguing question, Randall K. Wilson traces the often-forgotten ideas of nature that have shaped the evolution of America’s public land system. The result is a fresh and probing account of the most pressing policy and management challenges facing national parks, forests, rangelands, and wildlife refuges today. The author explores the dramatic story of the origins of the public domain, including the century-long push toward privatization and the subsequent emergence of a national conservation ideal. Arguing that we cannot fully understand one type of public land without understanding its relation to the rest of the system, he provides in-depth accounts of the different types of public lands. Including chapters on national parks, national forests, wildlife refuges, Bureau of Land Management lands, and wilderness areas, Wilson examines key turning points and major policy debates for each land type. He considers questions of bison and elk management and recent disputes over fire policy, roadless areas, mining claims, and grazing fees. This comprehensive overview offers a chance to rethink our relationship with America’s public lands, including what it says about the way we relate to, and value, nature in the United States.

The Woolly West

Colorado's Hidden History of Sheepscapes

Author: Andrew Gulliford

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623496535

Category: History

Page: 420

View: 5929

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In The Woolly West, historian Andrew Gulliford describes the sheep industry’s place in the history of Colorado and the American West. Tales of cowboys and cattlemen dominate western history—and even more so in popular culture. But in the competition for grazing lands, the sheep industry was as integral to the history of the American West as any trail drive. With vivid, elegant, and reflective prose, Gulliford explores the origins of sheep grazing in the region, the often-violent conflicts between the sheep and cattle industries, the creation of national forests, and ultimately the segmenting of grazing allotments with the passage of the Taylor Grazing Act of 1934. Deeper into the twentieth century, Gulliford grapples with the challenges of ecological change and the politics of immigrant labor. And in the present day, as the public lands of the West are increasingly used for recreation, conflicts between hikers and dogs guarding flocks are again putting the sheep industry on the defensive. Between each chapter, Gulliford weaves an account of his personal interaction with what he calls the “sheepscape”—that is, the sheepherders’ landscape itself. Here he visits with Peruvian immigrant herders and Mormon families who have grazed sheep for generations, explores delicately balanced stone cairns assembled by shepherds now long gone, and ponders the meaning of arborglyphs carved into unending aspen forests. The Woolly West is the first book in decades devoted to the sheep industry and breaks new ground in the history of the Colorado Basque, Greek, and Hispano shepherding families whose ranching legacies continue to the present day.

Pisgah National Forest

A History

Author: Marcia Spencer

Publisher: History Press

ISBN: 9781626196346

Category: History

Page: 206

View: 3907

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"A history of the Pisgah National Forest in North Carolina"--

Crabgrass Crucible

Suburban Nature and the Rise of Environmentalism in Twentieth-Century America

Author: Christopher C. Sellers

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807869902

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 5125

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Although suburb-building created major environmental problems, Christopher Sellers demonstrates that the environmental movement originated within suburbs--not just in response to unchecked urban sprawl. Drawn to the countryside as early as the late nineteenth century, new suburbanites turned to taming the wildness of their surroundings. They cultivated a fondness for the natural world around them, and in the decades that followed, they became sensitized to potential threats. Sellers shows how the philosophy, science, and emotions that catalyzed the environmental movement sprang directly from suburbanites' lives and their ideas about nature, as well as the unique ecology of the neighborhoods in which they dwelt. Sellers focuses on the spreading edges of New York and Los Angeles over the middle of the twentieth century to create an intimate portrait of what it was like to live amid suburban nature. As suburbanites learned about their land, became aware of pollution, and saw the forests shrinking around them, the vulnerability of both their bodies and their homes became apparent. Worries crossed lines of class and race and necessitated new ways of thinking and acting, Sellers argues, concluding that suburb-dwellers, through the knowledge and politics they forged, deserve much of the credit for inventing modern environmentalism.

Your Guide to the National Parks

The Complete Guide to All 59 National Parks

Author: Michael Joseph Oswald

Publisher: Stone Road Press

ISBN: 1621280683

Category: Travel

Page: 720

View: 799

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This award-winning guide, completely updated for the 2017 edition, includes more than 450 new photographs, 160 revised maps, and 50 hiking tables, making it the only guidebook you'll need to explore the United States National Parks. An all new design with the same intuitive layout keeps the step-by-step itineraries,kid-friendly activities, and most popular ranger programs at your fingertips to help plan your next family vacation. Thousands of hotels, restaurants, and attractions beyond the parks and 11 suggested road trips make it the ultimate dashboard companion. Exhaustive activity information--including hiking tables, easy-to-find trailhead markers, outfitter details, and backpacking essentials--serves as blueprint for an adventure of a lifetime. With something for everyone, this is Your Guide to the National Parks.

The lands nobody wanted

policy for national forests in the Eastern United States : a Conservation Foundation report

Author: William E. Shands,Robert G. Healy,Conservation Foundation

Publisher: Conservation Foundation

ISBN: N.A

Category: Nature

Page: 282

View: 742

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