Social Science in Government

The Role of Policy Researchers

Author: Richard P. Nathan

Publisher: Rockefeller Institute Press

ISBN: 1438436432

Category: POLITICAL SCIENCE

Page: 213

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A new, substantially updated, and expanded version of a classic work on how to evaluate public policy published over a decade ago.

So You Want to be in Government?

Handbook for the Appointed Officials in America's Governments

Author: Richard P. Nathan

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780914341758

Category: Political Science

Page: 91

View: 4646

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A guide for appointed officials in American government.

Postmodern Public Policy

Author: Hugh T. Miller

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791488039

Category: Political Science

Page: 132

View: 3453

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Confronts the challenge presented to traditional public policy by postmodern thought.

Law and Society

Author: Steven Vago

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131734684X

Category: Social Science

Page: 560

View: 7321

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For one-semester undergraduate courses in Law and Society, Sociology of Law, Introduction to Law, and a variety of criminal justice courses offered in departments of Sociology, Criminal Justice, and Political Science. Examines the interplay between law and society. Law and Society, 10e provides an informative, balanced and comprehensive analysis of the interplay between law and society. This text presents an overview of the most advanced interdisciplinary and international research, theoretical advances, ongoing debates and controversies. It raises new levels of awareness on the structure and functions of law and legal systems and the principal players in the legal arena and their impact on our lives. In addition, it looks at the legal system in the context of race, class, and gender and considers multicultural and cross-cultural issues in a contemporary and interdisciplinary context.

A World of Giving

Carnegie Corporation of New York?A Century of International Philanthropy

Author: Patricia Rosenfield

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 1610394305

Category: History

Page: 752

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The age of international philanthropy is upon us. Today, many of America’s most prominent foundations support institutions or programs abroad, but few have been active on the global stage for as long as Carnegie Corporation of New York. A World of Giving provides a thorough, objective examination of the international activities of Carnegie Corporation, one of America’s oldest and most respected philanthropic institutions, which was created by steel baron Andrew Carnegie in 1911 to support the “advancement and diffusion of knowledge and understanding.” The book explains in detail the grantmaking process aimed at promoting understanding across cultures and research in many nations across the world. A World of Giving highlights the vital importance of Carnegie Corporation’s mission in guiding its work, and the role of foundation presidents as thought and action leaders. The presidents, trustees, and later on, staff members, are the human element that drives philanthropy and they are the lens through which to view the inner workings of philanthropic institutions, with all of their accompanying strengths and limitations, especially when embarking on international activities. It also does not shy away from controversy, including early missteps in Canada, race and poverty issues in the 1930s and 1980s related to South Africa, promotion of area studies affected by the McCarthy Era, the critique of technical assistance in developing countries, the century-long failure to achieve international understanding on the part of Americans, and recent critiques by Australian historians of the Corporation’s nation-transforming work there. This is a comprehensive review of one foundation’s work on the international stage as well as a model for how philanthropy can be practiced in a deeply interconnected world where conflicts abound, but progress can be spurred by thoughtful, forward-looking institutions following humanistic principles.

Autopilot budgeting

will Congress ever respond to government performance data? : hearing before the Federal Financial Management, Government Information, and International Security Subcommittee of the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Ninth Congress, second session, June 13, 2006

Author: United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, and International Security

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 191

View: 8234

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Environmental Politics and Policy

A Comparative Approach

Author: Brent S. Steel,Richard L. Clinton,Nicholas P. Lovrich

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities Social

ISBN: 9780072392265

Category: Political Science

Page: 317

View: 4808

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This exciting new text for the Environmental Politics and/or Policy course(s) does not just look at this subject from a U.S. perspective, but an international one, expanding upon and reflecting the globalization of this important area of study. Using the comparative approach, students will learn about environmental issues but not without a larger context. Included in the comparative examination are post-industrial countries, developing countries, post-Communist countries, and of course, the U.S. In addition, chapters on science (what science is and how it fits into the political context), international law, and emerging issues (such as women and the environment) make this a strong and exciting text.

The Importance of Common Metrics for Advancing Social Science Theory and Research

A Workshop Summary

Author: National Research Council,Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education,Committee on Social Science Evidence for Use,Committee on Advancing Social Science Theory: The Importance of Common Metrics

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 030921100X

Category: Social Science

Page: 108

View: 9762

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In February 2010, the National Research Council convened a workshop to investigate the feasibility of developing well-grounded common metrics to advance behavioral and social science research, both in terms of advancing the development of theory and increasing the utility of research for policy and practice. The Workshop on Advancing Social Science Theory: The Importance of Common Metrics had three goals: To examine the benefits and costs involved in moving from metric diversity to greater standardization, both in terms of advancing the development of theory and increasing the utility of research for policy and practice. To consider whether a set of criteria can be developed for understanding when the measurement of a particular construct is ready to be standardized. To explore how the research community can foster a move toward standardization when it appears warranted. This book is a summary of the two days of presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop.

The Research System in Transition

Author: Susan E. Cozzens,Peter Healey,Arie Rip,John Ziman

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400920911

Category: Political Science

Page: 407

View: 3557

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On a mountainside in sunny Tuscany, in October 1989, 96 people from 23 countries on five continents gathered to learn and teach about the problems of managing contemporary science. The diversity of economic and political systems represented in the group was matched by our occupations, which stretched from science policy practitioners, through research scientists and engineers, through academic observers of science and science policy. It was this diversity, along with the opportunities for infonnal discussion provided by long meals and remote location, that made the conference a special learning experience. Except at lecture time, it was impossible to distinguish the "students" at this event from the "teachers," and even the most senior members of the teaching staff went away with a sense that they had learned more from this group than from many a standard conference on science policy they had attended. The flavor of the conference experience cannot be captured adequately in a proceedings volume, and so we have not tried to create a historical record in this book. Instead, we have attempted to illustrate the core problems the panicipants at the conference shared, discussed, and debated, using both lectures delivered by the fonnal teaching staff and summaries of panel discussions, which extended to other panicipants and therefore increased the range of experiences reponed.

New York State Government

2nd Edition

Author: Robert B. Ward

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781930912168

Category: Political Science

Page: 611

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An expanded and updated edition of the 2002 book that has become required reading for policymakers, students, and active citizens.

Using Science as Evidence in Public Policy

Author: Center for Education,Committee on the Use of Social Science Knowledge in Public Policy,Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education,National Research Council

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 0309261619

Category: Social Science

Page: 122

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Using Science as Evidence in Public Policy encourages scientists to think differently about the use of scientific evidence in policy making. This report investigates why scientific evidence is important to policy making and argues that an extensive body of research on knowledge utilization has not led to any widely accepted explanation of what it means to use science in public policy. Using Science as Evidence in Public Policy identifies the gaps in our understanding and develops a framework for a new field of research to fill those gaps. For social scientists in a number of specialized fields, whether established scholars or Ph.D. students, Using Science as Evidence in Public Policy shows how to bring their expertise to bear on the study of using science to inform public policy. More generally, this report will be of special interest to scientists who want to see their research used in policy making, offering guidance on what is required beyond producing quality research, beyond translating results into more understandable terms, and beyond brokering the results through intermediaries, such as think tanks, lobbyists, and advocacy groups. For administrators and faculty in public policy programs and schools, Using Science as Evidence in Public Policy identifies critical elements of instruction that will better equip graduates to promote the use of science in policy making.

Encyclopedia of Policy Studies, Second Edition,

Author: Stuart Nagel

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9780824791421

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 984

View: 5220

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"This entirely updated and enlarged Second Edition of a landmark reference/text continues to provide comprehensive coverage of every important aspect of policy studies--discussing concepts, methods, utilization, formation, and implementation both internationally and across each level of government."

The Century of the Child

The Mental Hygiene Movement and Social Policy in the United States and Canada

Author: Theresa Richardson

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438417268

Category: Social Science

Page: 273

View: 3604

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In this book, Richardson crosses disciplinary boundaries to examine mental hygiene issues of contemporary concern in both the United States and Canada. The work juxtaposes a social history of the child in the twentieth century to shifts in private and public power as influenced by the mental hygiene movements in both countries. The author shows how the historical record sheds light on current policy concerned with mentally, emotionally, and educationally handicapped children. As a sociology of mental illness, the book examines the relationship between mental hygiene as a form of knowledge and the social institutions that fostered the use of psychiatric perspectives concerning child and family life. Significant topics covered in this regard include the history of early childhood and parent education, the origins of child psychiatry in treating juvenile delinquency, and the evolution of contemporary concepts of normal development.

The Sixties

From Memory to History

Author: David Farber

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469608731

Category: History

Page: 342

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This collection of original essays represents some of the most exciting ways in which historians are beginning to paint the 1960s onto the larger canvas of American history. While the first literature about this turbulent period was written largely by participants, many of the contributors to this volume are young scholars who came of age intellectually in the 1970s and 1980s and thus write from fresh perspectives. The essayists ask fundamental questions about how much America really changed in the 1960s and why certain changes took place. In separate chapters, they explore how the great issues of the decade--the war in Vietnam, race relations, youth culture, the status of women, the public role of private enterprise--were shaped by evolutions in the nature of cultural authority and political legitimacy. They argue that the whirlwind of events and problems we call the Sixties can only be understood in the context of the larger history of post-World War II America. Contents "Growth Liberalism in the Sixties: Great Societies at Home and Grand Designs Abroad," by Robert M. Collins "The American State and the Vietnam War: A Genealogy of Power," by Mary Sheila McMahon "And That's the Way It Was: The Vietnam War on the Network Nightly News," by Chester J. Pach, Jr. "Race, Ethnicity, and the Evolution of Political Legitimacy," by David R. Colburn and George E. Pozzetta "Nothing Distant about It: Women's Liberation and Sixties Radicalism," by Alice Echols "The New American Revolution: The Movement and Business," by Terry H. Anderson "Who'll Stop the Rain?: Youth Culture, Rock 'n' Roll, and Social Crises," by George Lipsitz "Sexual Revolution(s)," by Beth Bailey "The Politics of Civility," by Kenneth Cmiel "The Silent Majority and Talk about Revolution," by David Farber

Field Notes

The Making of Middle East Studies in the United States

Author: Zachary Lockman

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 080479958X

Category: History

Page: 376

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Field Notes reconstructs the origins and trajectory of area studies in the United States, focusing on Middle East studies from the 1920s to the 1980s. Drawing on extensive archival research, Zachary Lockman shows how the Carnegie, Rockefeller, and Ford foundations played key roles in conceiving, funding, and launching postwar area studies, expecting them to yield a new kind of interdisciplinary knowledge that would advance the social sciences while benefiting government agencies and the American people. Lockman argues, however, that these new academic fields were not simply a product of the Cold War or an instrument of the American national security state, but had roots in shifts in the humanities and the social sciences over the interwar years, as well as in World War II sites and practices. This book explores the decision-making processes and visions of knowledge production at the foundations, the Social Science Research Council, and others charged with guiding the intellectual and institutional development of Middle East studies. Ultimately, Field Notes uncovers how area studies as an academic field was actually built—a process replete with contention, anxiety, dead ends, and consequences both unanticipated and unintended.