Slavery at Sea

Terror, Sex, and Sickness in the Middle Passage

Author: Sowande M Mustakeem

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252098994

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 3846

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Most times left solely within the confine of plantation narratives, slavery was far from a land-based phenomenon. This book reveals for the first time how it took critical shape at sea. Expanding the gaze even more widely, the book centers on how the oceanic transport of human cargoes--known as the infamous Middle Passage--comprised a violently regulated process foundational to the institution of bondage. Sowande' Mustakeem's groundbreaking study goes inside the Atlantic slave trade to explore the social conditions and human costs embedded in the world of maritime slavery. Mining ship logs, records and personal documents, Mustakeem teases out the social histories produced between those on traveling ships: slaves, captains, sailors, and surgeons. As she shows, crewmen manufactured captives through enforced dependency, relentless cycles of physical, psychological terror, and pain that led to the making--and unmaking--of enslaved Africans held and transported onboard slave ships. Mustakeem relates how this process, and related power struggles, played out not just for adult men, but also for women, children, teens, infants, nursing mothers, the elderly, diseased, ailing, and dying. As she does so, she offers provocative new insights into how gender, health, age, illness, and medical treatment intersected with trauma and violence transformed human beings into the most commercially sought commodity for over four centuries.

Slavery at Sea

Terror, Sex, and Sickness in the Middle Passage

Author: Sowande M. Mustakeem

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780252082023

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 8964

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Saltwater Slavery

A Middle Passage from Africa to American Diaspora

Author: Stephanie E. Smallwood

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674043770

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 1738

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This bold, innovative book promises to radically alter our understanding of the Atlantic slave trade, and the depths of its horrors. Stephanie E. Smallwood offers a penetrating look at the process of enslavement from its African origins through the Middle Passage and into the American slave market. Saltwater Slavery is animated by deep research and gives us a graphic experience of the slave trade from the vantage point of the slaves themselves. The result is both a remarkable transatlantic view of the culture of enslavement, and a painful, intimate vision of the bloody, daily business of the slave trade.

Violence over the Land

Indians and Empires in the Early American West

Author: Ned BLACKHAWK

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674020995

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 3054

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"Blackhawk, a Western Shoshone himself, does not portray the natives as victims. Instead, he demonstrates that their perseverance and ability to adapt to changing conditions over the last two centuries allowed them to help shape the world around them ... This is one of the finest studies available on native peoples of the ggreat basin region." John Burch, Library Journal, from the bookjacket.

Many Middle Passages

Forced Migration and the Making of the Modern World

Author: Emma Christopher,Cassandra Pybus,Marcus Rediker

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520252066

Category: History

Page: 263

View: 4702

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"Extends the concept of the Middle Passage to encompass the expropriation of people across other maritime and inland routes. No previous book has highlighted the diversity and centrality of middle passages, voluntary and involuntary, to modern global history."--Kenneth Morgan, author of Slavery and the British Empire "This volume extends the now well-established project of 'Atlantic World Studies' beyond its geographic and chronological frames to a genuinely global analysis of labour migration. It is a work of major importance that sparkles with new discoveries and insights."--Rick Halpern, co-editor of Empire and Others: British Encounters with Indigenous Peoples, 1600-1850

Medicalizing Blackness

Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840

Author: Rana A. Hogarth

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469632888

Category: Social Science

Page: 290

View: 6961

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In 1748, as yellow fever raged in Charleston, South Carolina, doctor John Lining remarked, "There is something very singular in the constitution of the Negroes, which renders them not liable to this fever." Lining's comments presaged ideas about blackness that would endure in medical discourses and beyond. In this fascinating medical history, Rana A. Hogarth examines the creation and circulation of medical ideas about blackness in the Atlantic World during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. She shows how white physicians deployed blackness as a medically significant marker of difference and used medical knowledge to improve plantation labor efficiency, safeguard colonial and civic interests, and enhance control over black bodies during the era of slavery. Hogarth refigures Atlantic slave societies as medical frontiers of knowledge production on the topic of racial difference. Rather than looking to their counterparts in Europe who collected and dissected bodies to gain knowledge about race, white physicians in Atlantic slaveholding regions created and tested ideas about race based on the contexts in which they lived and practiced. What emerges in sharp relief is the ways in which blackness was reified in medical discourses and used to perpetuate notions of white supremacy.

Slavery and African Ethnicities in the Americas

Restoring the Links

Author: Gwendolyn Midlo Hall

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807876862

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 7843

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Enslaved peoples were brought to the Americas from many places in Africa, but a large majority came from relatively few ethnic groups. Drawing on a wide range of materials in four languages as well as on her lifetime study of slave groups in the New World, Gwendolyn Midlo Hall explores the persistence of African ethnic identities among the enslaved over four hundred years of the Atlantic slave trade. Hall traces the linguistic, economic, and cultural ties shared by large numbers of enslaved Africans, showing that despite the fragmentation of the diaspora many ethnic groups retained enough cohesion to communicate and to transmit elements of their shared culture. Hall concludes that recognition of the survival and persistence of African ethnic identities can fundamentally reshape how people think about the emergence of identities among enslaved Africans and their descendants in the Americas, about the ways shared identity gave rise to resistance movements, and about the elements of common African ethnic traditions that influenced regional creole cultures throughout the Americas.

The Mulatta Concubine

Terror, Intimacy, Freedom, and Desire in the Black Transatlantic

Author: Lisa Ze Winters

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820348961

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 6311

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Popular and academic representations of the free mulatta concubine repeatedly depict women of mixed black African and white racial descent as defined by their sexual attachment to white men, and thus they offer evidence of the means to and dimensions of their freedom within Atlantic slave societies. In The Mulatta Concubine, Lisa Ze Winters contends that the uniformity of these representations conceals the figure’s centrality to the practices and production of diaspora. Beginning with a meditation on what captive black subjects may have seen and remembered when encountering free women of color living in slave ports, the book traces the echo of the free mulatta concubine across the physical and imaginative landscapes of three Atlantic sites: Gorée Island, New Orleans, and Saint Domingue (Haiti). Ze Winters mines an archive that includes a 1789 political petition by free men of color, a 1737 letter by a free black mother on behalf of her daughter, antebellum newspaper reports, travelers’ narratives, ethnographies, and Haitian Vodou iconography. Attentive to the tenuousness of freedom, Ze Winters argues that the concubine figure’s manifestation as both historical subject and African diasporic goddess indicates her centrality to understanding how free and enslaved black subjects performed gender, theorized race and freedom, and produced their own diasporic identities.

Dispossessed Lives

Enslaved Women, Violence, and the Archive

Author: Marisa J. Fuentes

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812248228

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 6772

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Vividly recounting the lives of enslaved women in eighteenth-century Bridgetown, Barbados, and their conditions of confinement through urban, legal, sexual, and representational power wielded by slave owners, authorities, and the archive, Marisa J. Fuentes challenges how histories of vulnerable and invisible subjects are written.

Africans to Spanish America

Expanding the Diaspora

Author: Sherwin K. Bryant,Rachel Sarah O'Toole,Ben Vinson (III.)

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252036638

Category: History

Page: 279

View: 5900

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"Exploring the connections between colonial Latin American historiography and the scholarship on the African Diaspora in the Spanish empires, Africans to Spanish America points to the continuities as well as disjunctures between the two fields of study. While a majority of the research on the colonial diaspora focuses on the Caribbean and Brazil, analysis of the regions of Mexico and the Andes open up new questions of community formation that incorporated Spanish legal strategies in secular and ecclesiastical institutions as well as articulations of multiple African identities. Therefore, it is critically important to expand the lens of the Diaspora framework that has come to shape so much of the recent scholarship on Africans in the Americas. Comprised of nine original essays, this volume is organized into three sections. Starting with voluntary and forced migrations across the Atlantic, Part I explores four distinct cases of identity construction that intersect with ongoing debates in African Diaspora scholarship regarding the models of continuity and creolization in the Americas. Part II interrogates how enslaved and free people employed their rights as Catholics to present themselves as civilized subjects, loyal Christians, and resisters to slavery. Part III asks how free people of color claimed categories of inclusion based on a identities of professional medical practitioners of "white" in transformative moments of the late colonial period"--

Slave Ships and Slaving

Author: George Francis Dow

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486143538

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 7677

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Grim commentaries by ships' doctors and captains about slave "factories," living conditions aboard ships, mutinies and their suppression, and more. 54 period illustrations. Unabridged reprint of the classic 1927 edition.

The Price for Their Pound of Flesh

The Value of the Enslaved, from Womb to Grave, in the Building of a Nation

Author: Daina Ramey Berry

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807047627

Category: SOCIAL SCIENCE

Page: 262

View: 573

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"Groundbreaking look at slaves as commodities through every phase of life, from birth to death and beyond, in early America The Price for Their Pound of Flesh is the first book to explore the economic value of enslaved people through every phase of their lives--including from before birth to after death--in the American domestic slave trades. Covering the full "life cycle" (including preconception, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, the senior years, and death), historian Daina Berry shows the lengths to which slaveholders would go to maximize profits. She draws from over ten years of research to explore how enslaved people responded to being appraised, bartered, and sold. By illuminating their lives, Berry ensures that the individuals she studies are regarded as people, not merely commodities. Analyzing the depth of this monetization of human property will change the way we think about slavery, reparations, capitalism, and nineteenth-century medical education"--

Surviving Slavery in the British Caribbean

Author: Randy M. Browne

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812294270

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 590

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Atlantic slave societies were notorious deathtraps. In Surviving Slavery in the British Caribbean, Randy M. Browne looks past the familiar numbers of life and death and into a human drama in which enslaved Africans and their descendants struggled to survive against their enslavers, their environment, and sometimes one another. Grounded in the nineteenth-century British colony of Berbice, one of the Atlantic world's best-documented slave societies and the last frontier of slavery in the British Caribbean, Browne argues that the central problem for most enslaved people was not how to resist or escape slavery but simply how to stay alive. Guided by the voices of hundreds of enslaved people preserved in an extraordinary set of legal records, Browne reveals a world of Caribbean slavery that is both brutal and breathtakingly intimate. Field laborers invoked abolitionist-inspired legal reforms to protest brutal floggings, spiritual healers conducted secretive nighttime rituals, anxious drivers weighed the competing pressures of managers and the condition of their fellow slaves in the fields, and women fought back against abusive masters and husbands. Browne shows that at the core of enslaved people's complicated relationships with their enslavers and one another was the struggle to live in a world of death. Provocative and unflinching, Surviving Slavery in the British Caribbean reorients the study of Atlantic slavery by revealing how differently enslaved people's social relationships, cultural practices, and political strategies appear when seen in the light of their unrelenting struggle to survive.

Medical Bondage

Race, Gender, and the Origins of American Gynecology

Author: Deirdre Cooper Owens

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820351342

Category: Medical

Page: 182

View: 9384

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The accomplishments of pioneering doctors such as John Peter Mettauer, James Marion Sims, and Nathan Bozeman are well documented. It is also no secret that these nineteenth-century gynecologists performed experimental caesarean sections, ovariotomies, and obstetric fistula repairs primarily on poor and powerless women. Medical Bondage breaks new ground by exploring how and why physicians denied these women their full humanity yet valued them as “medical superbodies” highly suited for medical experimentation. In Medical Bondage, Cooper Owens examines a wide range of scientific literature and less formal communications in which gynecologists created and disseminated medical fictions about their patients, such as their belief that black enslaved women could withstand pain better than white “ladies.” Even as they were advancing medicine, these doctors were legitimizing, for decades to come, groundless theories related to whiteness and blackness, men and women, and the inferiority of other races or nationalities. Medical Bondage moves between southern plantations and northern urban centers to reveal how nineteenth-century American ideas about race, health, and status influenced doctor-patient relationships in sites of healing like slave cabins, medical colleges, and hospitals. It also retells the story of black enslaved women and of Irish immigrant women from the perspective of these exploited groups and thus restores for us a picture of their lives.

Bound in Wedlock

Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Tera W. Hunter

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674979249

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 5779

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Tera W. Hunter offers the first comprehensive history of African American marriage in the nineteenth century and into the Jim Crow era. She reveals the practical ways couples adopted, adapted, or rejected white Christian ideas of marriage, creatively setting their own standards for conjugal relationships under conditions of uncertainty and cruelty.

Where the Negroes Are Masters

Author: Randy J. Sparks

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674726472

Category: History

Page: 321

View: 4347

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Annamaboe--largest slave trading port on the Gold Coast--was home to wily African merchants whose partnerships with Europeans made the town an integral part of Atlantic webs of exchange. Randy Sparks recreates the outpost's feverish bustle and brutality, tracing the entrepreneurs, black and white, who thrived on a lucrative traffic in human beings.

New Netherland Connections

Intimate Networks and Atlantic Ties in Seventeenth-Century America

Author: Susanah Shaw Romney

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469614251

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 2084

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New Netherland Connections: Intimate Networks and Atlantic Ties in Seventeenth-Century America

Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad

The Geography of Resistance

Author: Cheryl Janifer LaRoche

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252095898

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 7347

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This enlightening study employs the tools of archaeology to uncover a new historical perspective on the Underground Railroad. Unlike previous histories of the Underground Railroad, which have focused on frightened fugitive slaves and their benevolent abolitionist accomplices, Cheryl LaRoche focuses instead on free African American communities, the crucial help they provided to individuals fleeing slavery, and the terrain where those flights to freedom occurred. This study foregrounds several small, rural hamlets on the treacherous southern edge of the free North in Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. LaRoche demonstrates how landscape features such as waterways, iron forges, and caves played a key role in the conduct and effectiveness of the Underground Railroad. Rich in oral histories, maps, memoirs, and archaeological investigations, this examination of the "geography of resistance" tells the new powerful and inspiring story of African Americans ensuring their own liberation in the midst of oppression.

A Ghetto Takes Shape

Black Cleveland, 1870-1930

Author: Kenneth L. Kusmer

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252006906

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 4063

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Women and American Socialism, 1870-1920

Author: Mari Jo Buhle

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252010453

Category: Political Science

Page: 344

View: 5662

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""This splendid book should demonstrate to the still unconvinced that the new scholarship of the past decade on women has, by enriching our understanding of the place of women, deepened our understanding of the historical process in general. ... The exhaustive and imaginative research in this study creates a texture of rich detail about a variety of little-known aspects of women's history, labor history, and radical history and begins the rewriting of the history of American socialism."--Journal of American History."--Back cover.