GPS Declassified

Author: Richard D. Easton

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 1612344089

Category: Science

Page: 301

View: 4642

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GPS Declassified examines the development of GPS from its secret, Cold War military roots to its emergence as a worldwide consumer industry. Drawing on previously unexplored documents, the authors examine how military rivalries influenced the creation of GPS and shaped public perceptions about its origin. Since the United States’ first program to launch a satellite in the late 1950s, the nation has pursued dual paths into space—one military and secret, the other scientific and public. Among the many commercial spinoffs this approach has produced, GPS arguably boasts the greatest impact on our daily lives. Told by the son of a navy insider—whose work helped lay the foundations for the system—and a science and technology journalist, the story chronicles the research and technological advances required for the development of GPS. The authors peek behind the scenes at pivotal events in GPS history. They note how the technology moved from the laboratory to the battlefield to the dashboard and the smartphone, and they raise the specter of how this technology and its surrounding industry affect public policy. Insights into how the system works and how it fits into a long history of advances in navigation tie into discussions of the myriad applications for GPS.

Perfecting Sound Forever

An Aural History of Recorded Music

Author: Greg Milner

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 9781429957151

Category: Music

Page: 432

View: 5082

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In 1915, Thomas Edison proclaimed that he could record a live performance and reproduce it perfectly, shocking audiences who found themselves unable to tell whether what they were hearing was an Edison Diamond Disc or a flesh-and-blood musician. Today, the equation is reversed. Whereas Edison proposed that a real performance could be rebuilt with absolute perfection, Pro Tools and digital samplers now allow musicians and engineers to create the illusion of performances that never were. In between lies a century of sonic exploration into the balance between the real and the represented. Tracing the contours of this history, Greg Milner takes us through the major breakthroughs and glorious failures in the art and science of recording. An American soldier monitoring Nazi radio transmissions stumbles onto the open yet revolutionary secret of magnetic tape. Japanese and Dutch researchers build a first-generation digital audio format and watch as their "compact disc" is marketed by the music industry as the second coming of Edison yet derided as heretical by analog loyalists. The music world becomes addicted to volume in the nineties and fights a self-defeating "loudness war" to get its fix. From Les Paul to Phil Spector to King Tubby, from vinyl to pirated CDs to iPods, Milner's Perfecting Sound Forever pulls apart musical history to answer a crucial question: Should a recording document reality as faithfully as possible, or should it improve upon or somehow transcend the music it records? The answers he uncovers will change the very way we think about music.

Metallica: This Monster Lives

The Inside Story of Some Kind of Monster

Author: Joe Berlinger,Greg Milner

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1466866969

Category: Music

Page: 336

View: 8863

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Metallica is one of the most successful hard-rock bands of all time, having sold more than ninety million albums worldwide. Receiving unique, unfettered access, acclaimed filmmakers Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky followed Metallica over two and a half years as they faced monumental personal and professional challenges that threatened to destroy the bands just as they returned to the studio to record their first album in four years. While the documentary itself provides an insider's view of Metallica, the two and a half years of production (and more than 1,600 hours of footage) garnered far more than can be expressed in a two-hour film. Berlinger's book about the experience reveals the stories behind the film, capturing the energy, uncertainty, and ultimate triumph of both the filming and Metallica's bid for survival. It weaves the on-screen stories together with what happened off-screen, offering intimate details of the band's struggle amidst personnel changes, addiction, and controversy. In part because Berlinger was one of the only witnesses to the intensive group-therapy sessions and numerous band meetings, his account of his experience filming the band is the most honest and deeply probing book about Metallica - or any rock band - ever written. This is the book both Metallica and film fans have dreamed of - a stark and honest look at one of rock's most important bands through the eyes of the most provocative documentary filmmakers working today.

Pinpoint

How Challenging the Norm Is the Only Route to Success in Selling Sponsorship

Author: Jackie Fast

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781619618183

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 178

View: 3069

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Selling sponsorship is one of the most effective and profitable strategic business tools for any organisation. Whether you oversee a billion-dollar corporation, a medium-sized charity, a local arts council, or even a neighborhood children's football team, sponsorship needs to be part of your revenue and marketing mix. Not only does sponsorship bring in money, but it also drives engagement in a way that traditional marketing can't. Businesses, sports teams, music festivals, conferences, live events, small clubs and groups, nonprofits, and start-ups have all begun to realise the power of commercial collaboration and what those partnerships can deliver to their bottom line. But there's a catch. Selling sponsorship in today's landscape requires a different approach and some specialised knowledge that isn't readily available. This book will show you the pitfalls to avoid to ensure that virtually anyone can succeed.

Marconi

The Man Who Networked the World

Author: Marc Raboy

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199313598

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 7824

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A little over a century ago the world went wireless. Cables and all their limiting inefficiencies gave way to a revolutionary means of transmitting news and information almost everywhere, instantaneously. By means of "Hertzian waves," as radio waves were initially known, ships could now make contact with other ships (saving lives, such as on the doomed R.M.S. Titanic); financial markets could coordinate with other financial markets, establishing the price of commodities and fixing exchange rates; military commanders could connect with the front lines, positioning artillery and directing troop movements. Suddenly and irrevocably, time and space telescoped beyond what had been thought imaginable. Someone had not only imagined this networked world but realized it: Guglielmo Marconi. As Marc Raboy shows us in this enthralling and comprehensive biography, Marconi was the first truly global figure in modern communications. Born to an Italian father and an Irish mother, he was in many ways stateless, working his cosmopolitanism to advantage. Through a combination of skill, tenacity, luck, vision, and timing, Marconi popularized-and, more critically, patented-the use of radio waves. Soon after he burst into public view with a demonstration of his wireless apparatus in London at the age of 22 in 1896, he established his Wireless Telegraph & Signal Company and seemed unstoppable. He was decorated by the Czar of Russia, named an Italian Senator, knighted by King George V of England, and awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics-all before the age of 40. Until his death in 1937, Marconi was at the heart of every major innovation in electronic communication, courted by powerful scientific, political, and financial interests, and trailed by the media, which recorded and published nearly every one of his utterances. He established stations and transmitters in every corner of the globe, from Newfoundland to Buenos Aires, Hawaii to Saint Petersburg. Based on original research and unpublished archival materials in four countries and several languages, Raboy's book is the first to connect significant parts of Marconi's story, from his early days in Italy, to his groundbreaking experiments, to his protean role in world affairs. Raboy also explores Marconi's relationships with his wives, mistresses, and children, and examines in unsparing detail the last ten years of the inventor's life, when he returned to Italy and became a pillar of Benito Mussolini's fascist regime. Raboy's engrossing biography, which will stand as the authoritative work of its subject, proves that we still live in the world Marconi created.

Sound Reporting

The NPR Guide to Audio Journalism and Production

Author: Jonathan Kern

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022611175X

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 380

View: 7139

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Perhaps you’ve always wondered how public radio gets that smooth, well-crafted sound. Maybe you’re thinking about starting a podcast, and want some tips from the pros. Or maybe storytelling has always been a passion of yours, and you want to learn to do it more effectively. Whatever the case—whether you’re an avid NPR listener or you aspire to create your own audio, or both—Sound Reporting: The NPR Guide to Audio Journalism and Production will give you a rare tour of the world of a professional broadcaster. Jonathan Kern, who has trained NPR’s on-air staff for years, is a gifted guide, able to narrate a day in the life of a host and lay out the nuts and bolts of production with equal wit and warmth. Along the way, he explains the importance of writing the way you speak, reveals how NPR books guests ranging from world leaders to neighborhood newsmakers, and gives sage advice on everything from proposing stories to editors to maintaining balance and objectivity. Best of all—because NPR wouldn’t be NPR without its array of distinctive voices—lively examples from popular shows and colorful anecdotes from favorite personalities animate each chapter. As public radio’s audience of millions can attest, NPR’s unique guiding principles and technical expertise combine to connect with listeners like no other medium can. With today’s technologies allowing more people to turn their home computers into broadcast studios, Sound Reporting couldn’t have arrived at a better moment to reveal the secrets behind the story of NPR’s success.

Windfall

The Booming Business of Global Warming

Author: McKenzie Funk

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN: 0143126598

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 310

View: 2450

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An award-winning journalist shares the stories of entrepreneurs who are realizing marketing opportunities associated with global warming, from Israeli artificial snow-makers and private firefighters in California to fund managers backing Sudanese warlords and the Dutch architects of floating cities.

Code Warriors

NSA's Codebreakers and the Secret Intelligence War Against the Soviet Union

Author: Stephen Budiansky

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 0385352662

Category: History

Page: 389

View: 6202

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A sweeping, in-depth history of NSA, whose famous "cult of silence" has left the agency shrouded in mystery for decades The National Security Agency was born out of the legendary codebreaking programs of World War II that cracked the famed Enigma machine and other German and Japanese codes, thereby turning the tide of Allied victory. In the postwar years, as the United States developed a new enemy in the Soviet Union, our intelligence community found itself targeting not soldiers on the battlefield, but suspected spies, foreign leaders, and even American citizens. Throughout the second half of the twentieth century, NSA played a vital, often fraught and controversial role in the major events of the Cold War, from the Korean War to the Cuban Missile Crisis to Vietnam and beyond. In Code Warriors, Stephen Budiansky--a longtime expert in cryptology--tells the fascinating story of how NSA came to be, from its roots in World War II through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Along the way, he guides us through the fascinating challenges faced by cryptanalysts, and how they broke some of the most complicated codes of the twentieth century. With access to new documents, Budiansky shows where the agency succeeded and failed during the Cold War, but his account also offers crucial perspective for assessing NSA today in the wake of the Edward Snowden revelations. Budiansky shows how NSA's obsession with recording every bit of data and decoding every signal is far from a new development; throughout its history the depth and breadth of the agency's reach has resulted in both remarkable successes and destructive failures. Featuring a series of appendixes that explain the technical details of Soviet codes and how they were broken, this is a rich and riveting history of the underbelly of the Cold War, and an essential and timely read for all who seek to understand the origins of the modern NSA.

Eccentric Orbits

The Iridium Story

Author: John Bloom

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN: 0802192823

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 560

View: 1529

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“In the early 1990s, Motorola, the legendary American technology company developed a revolutionary satellite system called Iridium that promised to be its crowning achievement. Light years ahead of anything previously put into space, and built on technology developed for Ronald Reagan’s “Star Wars,” Iridium’s constellation of 66 satellites in polar orbit meant that no matter where you were on Earth, at least one satellite was always overhead, and you could call Tibet from Fiji without a delay and without your call ever touching a wire. ridium the satellite system was a mind-boggling technical accomplishment, surely the future of communication. The only problem was that Iridium the company was a commercial disaster. Only months after launching service, it was $11 billion in debt, burning through $100 million a month and crippled by baroque rate plans and agreements that forced calls through Moscow, Beijing, Fucino, Italy, and elsewhere. Bankruptcy was inevitable—the largest to that point in American history. And when no real buyers seemed to materialize, it looked like Iridium would go down as just a “science experiment.” That is, until Dan Colussy got a wild idea. Colussy, a former head of Pan-Am now retired and working on his golf game in Palm Beach, heard about Motorola’s plans to “de-orbit” the system and decided he would buy Iridium and somehow turn around one of the biggest blunders in the history of business. In “Eccentric Orbits”, John Bloom masterfully traces the conception, development, and launching of Iridium and Colussy’s tireless efforts to stop it from being destroyed, from meetings with his motley investor group, to the Clinton White House, to the Pentagon, to the hunt for customers in special ops, shipping, aviation, mining, search and rescue—anyone who would need a durable phone at the end of the Earth. Impeccably researched and wonderfully told, “Eccentric Orbits” is a rollicking, unforgettable tale of technological achievement, business failure, the military-industrial complex, and one of the greatest deals of all time.

Shadows of a Sunbelt City

The Environment, Racism, and the Knowledge Economy in Austin

Author: Eliot Tretter

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820344885

Category: Social Science

Page: 179

View: 6199

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"Austin, Texas is generally depicted as one of the great urban success stories of the past half century--a place that has grown enormously through 'creative class' strategies that emphasize diversity and environmental consciousness. Eliot Tretter's book reinterprets this familiar story by exploring the racial and environmental underpinnings of the postindustrial knowledge economy. He is particularly attentive to the role of the University of Texas (often working with federal, municipal, and private-sector partners), and the book will join a growing critical literature about how universities shape urban environments"--Provided by publisher.

The Globalization of American Infrastructure

The Shipping Container and Freight Transportation

Author: Matthew Heins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131728237X

Category: Social Science

Page: 222

View: 4791

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This book gives an account of how the U.S. freight transportation system has been impacted and “globalized,” since the 1950s, by the presence of the shipping container. A globally standardized object, the container carries cargo moving in international trade, and it utilizes and fits within the existing transportation infrastructures of shipping, trucking and railroads. In this way it binds them together into a nearly seamless worldwide logistics network. This process occurs not only in ocean shipping and at ports, but also deep within national territories. In its dependence on existing infrastructural systems, though, the network of container movement as it pervades domestic space is shaped by the history and geography of the nation-state. This global network is not invariably imposed in a top-down manner—to a large degree, it is cobbled together out of national, regional and local systems. Heins describes this in the American context, examining the freight transportation infrastructures of railroads, trucking and inland waterways, and also the terminals where containers are transferred between train and truck. The book provides a detailed historical narrative, and is also theoretically informed by the contemporary literature on infrastructure and globalization.

Finding North

How Navigation Makes Us Human

Author: George Michelsen Foy

Publisher: Flatiron Books

ISBN: 1250053897

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 4543

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Navigation is the key human skill. It's something we do everywhere, whether feeling our way through a bedroom in the dark, or charting a ship's course. But how does navigation affect our brains, our memory, ourselves? Blending scientific research and memoir, and written in beautiful prose, Finding North starts with a quest by the author to understand this most basic of human skills---and why it's in mortal peril. In 1844, Foy's great-great grandfather, captain of a Norwegian cargo ship, perished at sea after getting lost in a snowstorm. Foy decides to unravel the mystery surrounding Halvor Michelsen's death---and the roots of his own obsession with navigation---by re-creating his ancestor's trip using only period instruments. Beforehand, he meets a colorful cast of characters to learn whether men really have better directional skills than women, how cells, eels, and spaceships navigate; and how tragedy results from GPS glitches. He interviews a cabby who has memorized every street in London, sails on a Haitian cargo sloop, and visits the site of a secret navigational cult in Greece. At the heart of Foy's story is this fact: navigation and the brain's memory centers are inextricably linked. As Foy unravels the secret behind Halvor's death, he also discovers why forsaking our navigation skills in favor of GPS may lead not only to Alzheimers and other diseases of memory, but to losing a key part of what makes us human.

Digital Outcasts

Moving Technology Forward without Leaving People Behind

Author: Kel Smith

Publisher: Newnes

ISBN: 0124047130

Category: Computers

Page: 288

View: 1105

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The blind person who tries to make an online purchase. The young girl who cannot speak due to a cognitive disability. The man confined to his home due to permanent injury. The single mother with a long-term illness who struggles to feed her family. With one in seven people worldwide currently living with a disability, the term "outcast" covers numerous scenarios. Digital outcasts rely on technology for everyday services that many people take for granted. However, poorly designed products risk alienating this important (and growing) population. Through a "grass roots" approach to innovation, digital outcasts are gradually taking action to transform their lives and communities. This emerging trend provides exciting learning opportunities for all of us. Citing real-world case studies from healthcare to social science, this book examines the emerging legal and cultural impact of inclusive design. Gain a better understanding of how people with disabilities use technology Discover pitfalls and approaches to help you stay current in your UX practices Anticipate a future in which ambient benefit can be achieved for people of all abilities and backgrounds

The Four-Dimensional Human: Ways of Being in the Digital World

Author: Laurence Scott

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393353087

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 272

View: 4282

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You are a four-dimensional human. Each of us exists in three-dimensional, physical space. But, as a constellation of everyday digital phenomena rewires our lives, we are increasingly coaxed from the containment of our predigital selves into a wonderful and eerie fourth dimension, a world of ceaseless communication, instant information, and global connection. Our portals to this new world have been wedged open, and the silhouette of a figure is slowly taking shape. But what does it feel like to be four-dimensional? How do digital technologies influence the rhythms of our thoughts, the style and tilt of our consciousness? What new sensitivities and sensibilities are emerging with our exposure to the delights, sorrows, and anxieties of a networked world? And how do we live in public with these recoded private lives? Laurence Scott—hailed as a “New Generation Thinker” by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the BBC—shows how this four-dimensional life is dramatically changing us by redefining our social lives and extending the limits of our presence in the world. Blending tech-philosophy with insights on everything from Seinfeld to the fall of Gaddafi, Scott stands with a rising generation of social critics hoping to understand our new reality. His virtuosic debut is a revelatory and original exploration of life in the digital age.

Geomatics Engineering

A Practical Guide to Project Design

Author: Clement A. Ogaja

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 1439895112

Category: Science

Page: 296

View: 3907

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Traditionally, land surveyors experience years of struggle as they encounter the complexities of project planning and design processes in the course of professional employment or practice. Giving beginners a leg up and working professionals added experience, Geomatics Engineering: A Practical Guide to Project Design provides a practical guide to contemporary issues in geomatics professionalism, ethics, and design. It explores issues encountered during the project design and the request for proposal process commonly used for soliciting professional geomatics engineering services. Designed to develop critical thinking and problem solving, this book: reflects the natural progression of project design considerations, including how the planning, information gathering, design, scheduling, cost estimating, and proposal writing fit into the overall scheme of project design process presents the details of contemporary issues such as standards and specifications, professional and ethical responsibilities, and policy, social, and environmental issues that are pertinent to geomatics engineering projects demonstrates the important considerations when planning or designing new projects focuses on the proposal development process and shows how to put together a project cost estimate, including estimating quantities and developing unit and lump-sum costs Based on experience of past projects, the book identifies priority areas of attention for planning new projects. Presenting the nuts and bolts of geomatics projects, the author provides an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility, the impact of engineering solutions in a global and social context, as well as a host of other contemporary issues such as budgetary and scheduling constraints.

Useful Girl

A Novel

Author: Marcus Stevens

Publisher: Algonquin Books

ISBN: 1565129016

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 5939

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This evocative novel “weaves together the journeys of a contemporary Montana teen and an 1870s Cheyenne girl” (School Library Journal). After her mother’s sudden death, Erin Douglass is virtually alone in the world. When she witnesses the exhumation of a Cheyenne girl along the side of a dirt road, life in her western town indelibly changes. The girl’s remains, gently wrapped in a faded army coat, with silver thimbles on her right hand, are more than a hundred years old. Though her father, the construction foreman, makes every attempt to keep the discovery quiet, Erin is haunted by questions: How did this young girl end up here, in the middle of nowhere, with no marker and all alone? Who was she? Together with Charlie White Bird, a young member of her father’s road crew from the nearby reservation, Erin is determined to protect the burial ground. She and Charlie meet in secret, knowing that their encounters could threaten their divided communities. But as their commitment to their cause becomes more passionate, so, too, does their relationship. When Erin is faced with a crisis she feels she must bear alone, she runs away. With her mother’s old suitcase and her granddad’s journals on the Indian wars, she sets out. As she moves farther from home, the Cheyenne girl’s story vividly unfolds in her mind—guiding her toward another way out of her predicament.

The Plateau Effect

Getting from Stuck to Success

Author: Bob Sullivan,Hugh Thompson

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101624248

Category: Psychology

Page: 320

View: 1065

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The Plateau Effect is a powerful law of nature that affects everyone. Learn to identify plateaus and break through any stagnancy in your life— from diet and exercise, to work, to relationships. The Plateau Effect shows how athletes, scientists, therapists, companies, and musicians around the world are learning to break through their plateaus—to turn off the forces that cause people to “get used to” things—and turn on human potential and happiness in ways that seemed impossible. The book identifies three key flattening forces that generate plateaus, two principles to guide readers in engineering a plateau’s destruction, and three actions to take to achieve peak behavior. It helps us to stop wasting time on things that are no longer of value and to focus on the things that leverage our time and energy in spectacular ways. Anything you want to do better—play guitar, make friends, communicate with your children, run a business—you can accomplish faster by understanding the plateau effect.

Weapons of Math Destruction

How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy

Author: Cathy O'Neil

Publisher: Crown Books

ISBN: 0553418815

Category: Big data

Page: 259

View: 3367

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"A former Wall Street quantitative analyst sounds an alarm on mathematical modeling, a pervasive new force in society that threatens to undermine democracy and widen inequality, "--NoveList.

Engineering Surveying Technology

Author: T.J.M. Kennie,G. Petrie

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 1482269376

Category: Architecture

Page: N.A

View: 2848

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This book examines the major changes in the technology now used for the measurement and processing of topographic and non-topographic spatial data, with emphasis on the new and emerging technology and its applications. Fundamental principles are introduced to explain the basic operation of different types of equipment.

Science in the Soul

Selected Writings of a Passionate Rationalist

Author: Richard Dawkins

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0399592245

Category: Science

Page: 448

View: 1436

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A "defense of science and clear thinking [in a] career-spanning collection of essays, including twenty pieces published in the United States for the first time"--Amazon.com.