Pennsylvania's Coal and Iron Police

Author: Spencer J. Sadler

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738564708

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 9147

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Pennsylvania's Coal and Iron Police ruled small patch towns and industrial cities for their coal and iron company bosses from 1865 to 1931. Armed with a gun and badge and backed by state legislation, the members of the private police force were granted power in a practically unspecified jurisdiction. Set in Pennsylvania's anthracite and bituminous regions, including Luzerne, Schuylkill, Westmoreland, Beaver, Somerset, and Indiana Counties, at a time when labor disputes were deadly, the officers are the story behind American labor history's high-profile events and attention-grabbing headlines. Paid to protect company property, their duties varied but unfortunately often resulted in strikebreaking, intimidation, and violence.

Strikebreaking and Intimidation

Mercenaries and Masculinity in Twentieth-Century America

Author: Stephen H. Norwood

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807860468

Category: Political Science

Page: 344

View: 3746

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This is the first systematic study of strikebreaking, intimidation, and anti-unionism in the United States, subjects essential to a full understanding of labor's fortunes in the twentieth century. Paradoxically, the country that pioneered the expansion of civil liberties allowed corporations to assemble private armies to disrupt union organizing, spy on workers, and break strikes. Using a social-historical approach, Stephen Norwood focuses on the mercenaries the corporations enlisted in their anti-union efforts--particularly college students, African American men, the unemployed, and men associated with organized crime. Norwood also considers the paramilitary methods unions developed to counter mercenary violence. The book covers a wide range of industries across much of the country. Norwood explores how the early twentieth-century crisis of masculinity shaped strikebreaking's appeal to elite youth and the media's romanticization of the strikebreaker as a new soldier of fortune. He examines how mining communities' perception of mercenaries as agents of a ribald, sexually unrestrained, new urban culture intensified labor conflict. The book traces the ways in which economic restructuring, as well as shifting attitudes toward masculinity and anger, transformed corporate anti-unionism from World War II to the present.

Less Than Forever

The Rise and Decline of Union Solidarity in Western Pennsylvania, 1914-1948

Author: Carl I. Meyerhuber

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 235

View: 1767

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A study of the emergence of local rank-and-file movements in the aluminum, coal, electrical equipment and steel industries and on the communities that spawned them. It assesses the ideology, organization, uses of power, sources of authority, and, above all, struggle for control of Western Pennsylvania's labor movement.

Homestead and the Steel Valley

Author: Daniel J. Burns

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738554877

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 3509

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Western Pennsylvania is dotted with what are known locally as mill towns, but few of these communities epitomize this definition more than the municipalities of Homestead, West Homestead, and Munhall. Commonly referred to as the Steel Valley, these towns were home to some of the greatest steel-producing operations in the world. As the Mon Valley's steel production answered the nation's call during two world wars, so did the workers who unloaded countless barges of coal and fed the mills' great furnaces that produced the material needed for weapons, armament, and tanks. Workers emigrated from every country in Europe to make their mark in America. Many of these people spoke little or no English and endured long hours of labor in often hazardous conditions. Their families brought with them the traditions of their varied European cultures, filling their communities with ethnic diversity. Through 200 photographs, Homestead and the Steel Valley conveys the proud heritage of three communities and their role in the nation's history.

Cloud by Day

A Story of Coal and Coke and People

Author: Muriel Earley Sheppard

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469610949

Category: History

Page: 282

View: 9206

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This book, written from the author's personal knowledge of the district, is a picture of the fabulous and violent past of Pennsylvania's famed coke region and of its uncertain present. In tracing its history Sheppard shows the changes in methods of production and in the racial character of the population; she pictures early mob violence, the activities of coal and iron police, and the conditions that led to union organization in the section. Originally published in 1947. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

Mining Disasters of the Wyoming Valley

Author: Bryan Glahn

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439655731

Category: Nature

Page: 128

View: 5796

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Ten-year-old Willie Hatton was excited to visit his father at the Avondale Mine on the morning of September 6, 1869. Sadly, Willie would die in his father’s arms that day, and so would 108 other miners, all victims of a horrific fire that tore through the shaft, trapping the men and boys and blocking the only exit. The communities of the Wyoming Valley know firsthand the human cost of the anthracite industry. From a cave-in at Twin Shaft to an explosion at the Baltimore Tunnel to the Susquehanna River crashing through the roof at Knox, thousands of miners left for work in the morning never to return. Sadly, few of the tragedies could be called accidents. Profits took precedence over safety, leaving workers to pay the price for negligence, corruption, and greed.

Coal

A Human History

Author: Barbara Freese

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465096182

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 861

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In this remarkable book, Barbara Freese takes us on a rich historical journey that begins hundreds of millions of years ago and spans the globe. Prized as “the best stone in Britain” by Roman invaders who carved jewelry out of it, coal has transformed societies, launched empires, and expanded frontiers. It made China an eleventh-century superpower, inspired the Communist Manifesto, and helped the North win the American Civil War. Yet coal's transformative power has come at tremendous cost, from the blackening of our lungs and skies, to the perils of mining, to global warming. Now updated with a new chapter describing the high-stakes conflict between coal's defenders and those working to preserve a livable climate, Coal offers a captivating history of the mineral that helped build the modern world but now endangers our future.

Inventing the Pinkertons; or, Spies, Sleuths, Mercenaries, and Thugs

Being a story of the nation’s most famous (and infamous) detective agency

Author: S. Paul O'Hara

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421420570

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 3417

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Between 1865 and 1937, Pinkerton’s National Detective Agency was at the center of countless conflicts between capital and labor, bandits and railroads, and strikers and state power. Some believed that the detectives were protecting society from dangerous criminal conspiracies; others thought that armed Pinkertons were capital’s tool to crush worker dissent. Yet the image of the Pinkerton detective also inspired romantic and sensationalist novels, reflected shifting ideals of Victorian manhood, and embodied a particular kind of rough frontier justice. Inventing the Pinkertons examines the evolution of the agency as a pivotal institution in the cultural history of American monopoly capitalism. Historian S. Paul O’Hara intertwines political, social, and cultural history to reveal how Scottish-born founder Allan Pinkerton insinuated his way to power and influence as a purveyor of valuable (and often wildly wrong) intelligence in the Union cause. During Reconstruction, Pinkerton turned his agents into icons of law and order in the Wild West. Finally, he transformed his firm into a for-rent private army in the war of industry against labor. Having begun life as peddlers of information and guardians of mail bags, the Pinkertons became armed mercenaries, protecting scabs and corporate property from angry strikers. O’Hara argues that American capitalists used the Pinkertons to enforce new structures of economic and political order. Yet the infamy of the Pinkerton agent also gave critics and working communities a villain against which to frame their resistance to the new industrial order. Ultimately, Inventing the Pinkertons is a gripping look at how the histories of American capitalism, industrial folklore, and the nation-state converged.

Miner Injustice

The Ragman's War

Author: R. S. Sukle

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 0595361277

Category: Fiction

Page: 332

View: 2912

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Sukle's book is well researched, and her dialogue rings true to the accent and the feeling of those fraught times. It is a praiseworthy effort, and one expects to see more of Sukle as a writer/historian. -Barbara Bamberger Scott, Women Writers Review During the coal strike of 1927, the coalfields of western Pennsylvania become a hotbed of tension and terror. A mine mechanic and World War I hero, Ragman walks away from his job at the Russellton Mine. He originally wants no part of the union fight, but is slowly drawn in by his activist brothers. When a new unit of special Coal and Iron Police arrives in Russellton to terrorize the town and end the strike, Ragman scarcely realizes that the commander, Herman Bucholtz, has his own agenda. Appointed by the governor to break the strike and evict the miners from their homes, he imposes unconstitutional restrictions to keep out relief workers and organizers. Thus begins an intricate, emotional tangle that leads Ragman and his fellow activists on an escalating, fanatical path of revenge and self-discovery, culminating in a life-and-death struggle.

Making Sense of the Molly Maguires

Author: Kevin Kenny

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195116311

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 2634

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A group of 20 Irish immigrants, suspected of comprising a secret terrorist organization called the "Molly Maguires", were executed in Pennsylvania in the 1870s for the murder of 16 men. This work offers a new interpretation of their dramatic story, tracing the origins of the Molly Maguires to Ireland and explaining the growth of a particular structure of meaning.

The Guns of Lattimer

Author: Michael Novak

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351303783

Category: Fiction

Page: 276

View: 9195

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On September 10, 1897, in the hamlet of Lattimer mines, Pennsylvania, an armed posse took aim and fired into a crowd of oncoming mine workers, who were marching in their corner of the coal-mining region to call their fellow miners out on strike. The marchers Poles, Slovaks, Hungarians, most of whom could not yet speak English were themselves armed only with an American flag and a timid, budding confidence in their new found rights as free men in their newly adopted country. The mine operators took another view of these rights and of the strange, alien men who claimed them. When the posse was done firing, nineteen of the demonstrators were dead and thirty-nine were seriously wounded. Some six months later a jury of their peers was to exonerate the deputies of any wrong-doing. This long-forgotten incident is here movingly retold by Michael Novak, himself the son of Slovak immigrants and one of our most gifted writers and social observers. In his hands, the so-called "Lattimer Massacre" becomes not only a powerful story in its own right (and an invaluable key to the history of the growth of the united mine Workers), but an allegory of that peculiarly American experience undergone over and over again throughout the land, and down to this very day; the experience of new immigrants, still miserable with poverty and bewilderment and suffering the trauma of culture shock, being confronted by the hostility and blind contempt of the "real" Americans. In Michael Novak's uniquely vivid account, the incident at Lattimer is seen as a tragedy brought on not so much by inhumanity as by the profound failure of majority WASP society to understand the needs and responses of "foreigners." The Guns of Lattimer is a gripping book that tells Americans, old and new, a great deal about themselves and the society they live in.

Industrial Relations

Final Report and Testimony

Author: United States. Commission on Industrial Relations,Francis Patrick Walsh,Basil Maxwell Manly

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Industrial relations

Page: N.A

View: 7704

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The Face of Decline

The Pennsylvania Anthracite Region in the Twentieth Century

Author: Thomas Dublin

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501707299

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 7116

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The anthracite coal region of Pennsylvania once prospered. Today, very little mining or industry remains, although residents have made valiant efforts to restore the fabric of their communities. In The Face of Decline, the noted historians Thomas Dublin and Walter Licht offer a sweeping history of this area over the course of the twentieth century. Combining business, labor, social, political, and environmental history, Dublin and Licht delve into coal communities to explore grassroots ethnic life and labor activism, economic revitalization, and the varied impact of economic decline across generations of mining families. The Face of Decline also features the responses to economic crisis of organized capital and labor, local business elites, redevelopment agencies, and state and federal governments. Dublin and Licht draw on a remarkable range of sources: oral histories and survey questionnaires; documentary photographs; the records of coal companies, local governments, and industrial development corporations; federal censuses; and community newspapers. The authors examine the impact of enduring economic decline across a wide region but focus especially on a small group of mining communities in the region's Panther Valley, from Jim Thorpe through Lansford to Tamaqua. The authors also place the anthracite region within a broader conceptual framework, comparing anthracite's decline to parallel developments in European coal basins and Appalachia and to deindustrialization in the United States more generally.