Out of Place

Englishness, Empire, and the Locations of Identity

Author: Ian Baucom

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400823031

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 8068

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In a 1968 speech on British immigration policy, Enoch Powell insisted that although a black man may be a British citizen, he can never be an Englishman. This book explains why such a claim was possible to advance and impossible to defend. Ian Baucom reveals how "Englishness" emerged against the institutions and experiences of the British Empire, rendering English culture subject to local determinations and global negotiations. In his view, the Empire was less a place where England exerted control than where it lost command of its own identity. Analyzing imperial crisis zones--including the Indian Mutiny of 1857, the Morant Bay uprising of 1865, the Amritsar massacre of 1919, and the Brixton riots of 1981--Baucom asks if the building of the empire completely refashioned England's narratives of national identity. To answer this question, he draws on a surprising range of sources: Victorian and imperial architectural theory, colonial tourist manuals, lexicographic treatises, domestic and imperial cricket culture, country house fetishism, and the writings of Ruskin, Kipling, Ford Maddox Ford, Forster, Rhys, C.L.R. James, Naipaul, and Rushdie--and representations of urban riot on television, in novels, and in parliamentary sessions. Emphasizing the English preoccupation with place, he discusses some crucial locations of Englishness that replaced the rural sites of Wordsworthian tradition: the Morant Bay courthouse, Bombay's Gothic railway station, the battle grounds of the 1857 uprising in India, colonial cricket fields, and, last but not least, urban riot zones.

The Island Race

Englishness, Empire and Gender in the Eighteenth Century

Author: Kathleen Wilson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113620864X

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 6689

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Rooted in a period of vigorous exploration and colonialism, The Island Race: Englishness, empire and gender in the eighteenth century is an innovative study of the issues of nation, gender and identity. Wilson bases her analysis on a wide range of case studies drawn both from Britain and across the Atlantic and Pacific worlds. Creating a colourful and original colonial landscape, she considers topics such as: * sodomy * theatre * masculinity * the symbolism of Britannia * the role of women in war. Wilson shows the far-reaching implications that colonial power and expansion had upon the English people's sense of self, and argues that the vaunted singularity of English culture was in fact constituted by the bodies, practices and exchanges of peoples across the globe. Theoretically rigorous and highly readable, The Island Race will become a seminal text for understanding the pressing issues that it confronts.

Specters of the Atlantic

Finance Capital, Slavery, and the Philosophy of History

Author: Ian Baucom

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822387026

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 398

View: 7457

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In September 1781, the captain of the British slave ship Zong ordered 133 slaves thrown overboard, enabling the ship’s owners to file an insurance claim for their lost “cargo.” Accounts of this horrific event quickly became a staple of abolitionist discourse on both sides of the Atlantic. Ian Baucom revisits, in unprecedented detail, the Zong atrocity, the ensuing court cases, reactions to the event and trials, and the business and social dealings of the Liverpool merchants who owned the ship. Drawing on the work of an astonishing array of literary and social theorists, including Walter Benjamin, Giovanni Arrighi, Jacques Derrida, and many others, he argues that the tragedy is central not only to the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the political and cultural archives of the black Atlantic but also to the history of modern capital and ethics. To apprehend the Zong tragedy, Baucom suggests, is not to come to terms with an isolated atrocity but to encounter a logic of violence key to the unfolding history of Atlantic modernity. Baucom contends that the massacre and the trials that followed it bring to light an Atlantic cycle of capital accumulation based on speculative finance, an economic cycle that has not yet run its course. The extraordinarily abstract nature of today’s finance capital is the late-eighteenth-century system intensified. Yet, as Baucom highlights, since the late 1700s, this rapacious speculative culture has had detractors. He traces the emergence and development of a counter-discourse he calls melancholy realism through abolitionist and human-rights texts, British romantic poetry, Scottish moral philosophy, and the work of late-twentieth-century literary theorists. In revealing how the Zong tragedy resonates within contemporary financial systems and human-rights discourses, Baucom puts forth a deeply compelling, utterly original theory of history: one that insists that an eighteenth-century atrocity is not past but present within the future we now inhabit.

"Artwriting, Nation, and Cosmopolitanism in Britain "

The 'Englishness' of English Art Theory since the Eighteenth Century

Author: MarkA. Cheetham

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351575228

Category: Art

Page: 204

View: 8729

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Arguing in favour of renewed critical attention to the 'nation' as a category in art history, this study examines the intertwining of art theory, national identity and art production in Britain from the early eighteenth century to the present day. The book provides the first sustained account of artwriting in the British context over the full extent of its development and includes new analyses of such central figures as Hogarth, Reynolds, Gilpin, Ruskin, Roger Fry, Herbert Read, Art & Language, Peter Fuller and Rasheed Araeen. Mark A. Cheetham also explores how the 'Englishing' of art theory-which came about despite the longstanding occlusion of the intellectual and theoretical in British culture-did not take place or have effects exclusively in Britain. Theory has always travelled with art and vice versa. Using the frequently resurgent discourse of cosmopolitanism as a frame for his discourse, Cheetham asks whether English traditions of artwriting have been judged inappropriately according to imported criteria of what theory is and does. This book demonstrates that artwriting in the English tradition has not been sufficiently studied, and that 'English Art Theory' is not an oxymoron. Such concerns resonate today beyond academe and the art world in the many heated discussions of resurgent Englishness.

Empire and After

Englishness in Postcolonial Perspective

Author: Graham MacPhee,Prem Poddar

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9780857453334

Category: Social Science

Page: 218

View: 8231

DOWNLOAD NOW »
The growing debate over British national identity, and the place of "Englishness" within it, raises crucial questions about multiculturalism, postimperial culture and identity, and the past and future histories of globalization. However, discussions of Englishness have too often been limited by insular conceptions of national literature, culture, and history, which serve to erase or marginalize the colonial and postcolonial locations in which British national identity has been articulated. This volume breaks new ground by drawing together a range of disciplinary approaches in order to resituate the relationship between British national identity and Englishness within a global framework. Ranging from the literature and history of empire to analyses of contemporary culture, postcolonial writing, political rhetoric, and postimperial memory after 9/11, this collection demonstrates that far from being parochial or self-involved, the question of Englishness offers an important avenue for thinking about the politics of national identity in our postcolonial and globalized world.

The Revisions of Englishness

Author: David Rogers,John McLeod

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719069727

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 194

View: 717

DOWNLOAD NOW »
What is 'Englishness'? Who defines it? What impact have changes to England and the English, as well as England's relationship with the outside world, had on 'Englishness'? Has 'Englishness' become an anachronism at the turn of a new century?These questions and others like them have become familiar ones in recent debates concerning English politics, culture and identity. Diverse and often competing notions of 'Englishness' have been critiqued by a variety of writers and critics who have become concerned about received visions of 'Englishness' in the post-war period. An exciting and provocative collection of essays which registers the changes to Englishness since the 1950s, 'The revisions of Englishness' explores how Englishness has been revised for a variety of aesthetic and political purposes and makes a ground-breaking contribution to the contemporary debates surrounding Englishness in literary and cultural studies.

Imperial Co-histories

National Identities and the British and Colonial Press

Author: Julie F. Codell

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN: 9780838639733

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 8217

DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book explores the creation of imperial identities in Britain and several of its colonies--South Africa, India, Australia, Wales--and the ways in which the Victorian press around the world shaped and reflected these identities. The concept of co-histories, borrowed from Edward Said and Frantz Fanon, helps explain how the press shaped the imperial and national identities of Britain and of the colonies into co-histories that were thoroughly intertwined and symbiotic. Exploring a variety of press media, this book argues that the press was a site of resistance and revision by colonized authors and publishers, as well as a force of colonial authority for the British government. The contributors analyze the writings of British and colonial writers, editors, and publishers, who projected a view of the empire to their British, colonial, and colonized readers. Topics include "The Journal of Indian Art and Industry produced by the British art schools in India, women's periodicals, Indian writers in the British press, "The Imperial Gazetteer published in Scotland, the rise of telegraphic news agencies, the British press's images of China seen through exhibitions of its art, the Tory periodical "Blackwood's Magazine, and the Imperial Press Conference of 1909. Illustrated.

Neo-Victorianism and the Memory of Empire

Author: Elizabeth Ho

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441187707

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 7039

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Examining the global dimensions of Neo-Victorianism, this book explores how the appropriation of Victorian images in contemporary literature and culture has emerged as a critical response to the crises of decolonization and Imperial collapse. � Neo-Victorianism and the Memory of Empire explores the phenomenon by reading a range of popular and literary Anglophone neo-Victorian texts, including Alan Moore's Graphic Novel From Hell, works by Peter Carey and Margaret Atwood, the films of Jackie Chan and contemporary 'Steampunk' science fiction. Through these readings� Elizabeth Ho explores how constructions of popular memory and fictionalisations of the past reflect political and psychological engagements with our contemporary post-Imperial circumstances.

England's Secular Scripture

Islamophobia and the Protestant Aesthetic

Author: Jo Carruthers

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1441142754

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 160

View: 8158

DOWNLOAD NOW »
By outlining Protestantism and Englishness in early-modern literature to the present-day, this study reveals how other religious identities can be alienated in British society.

Cosmopolitan Style

Modernism Beyond the Nation

Author: Rebecca L. Walkowitz

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231510535

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 7152

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this broad-ranging and ambitious intervention in the debates over the politics, ethics, and aesthetics of cosmopolitanism, Rebecca L. Walkowitz argues that modernist literary style has been crucial to new ways of thinking and acting beyond the nation. While she focuses on modernist narrative, Walkowitz suggests that style conceived expansively as attitude, stance, posture, and consciousness helps to explain many other, nonliterary formations of cosmopolitanism in history, anthropology, sociology, transcultural studies, and media studies. Walkowitz shows that James Joyce, Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, Salman Rushdie, Kazuo Ishiguro, and W. G. Sebald use the salient features of literary modernism in their novels to explore different versions of transnational thought, question moral and political norms, and renovate the meanings of national culture and international attachment. By deploying literary tactics of naturalness, triviality, evasion, mix-up, treason, and vertigo, these six authors promote ideas of democratic individualism on the one hand and collective projects of antifascism or anti-imperialism on the other. Joyce, Conrad, and Woolf made their most significant contribution to this "critical cosmopolitanism" in their reflection on the relationships between narrative and political ideas of progress, aesthetic and social demands for literalism, and sexual and conceptual decorousness. Specifically, Walkowitz considers Joyce's critique of British imperialism and Irish nativism; Conrad's understanding of the classification of foreigners; and Woolf's exploration of how colonizing policies rely on ideas of honor and masculinity. Rushdie, Ishiguro, and Sebald have revived efforts to question the definitions and uses of naturalness, argument, utility, attentiveness, reasonableness, and explicitness, but their novels also address a range of "new ethnicities" in late-twentieth-century Britain and the different internationalisms of contemporary life. They use modernist strategies to articulate dynamic conceptions of local and global affiliation, with Rushdie in particular adding playfulness and confusion to the politics of antiracism. In this unique and engaging study, Walkowitz shows how Joyce, Conrad, and Woolf developed a repertoire of narrative strategies at the beginning of the twentieth century that were transformed by Rushdie, Ishiguro, and Sebald at the end. Her book brings to the forefront the artful idiosyncrasies and political ambiguities of twentieth-century modernist fiction.

Englishness and Empire 1939-1965

Author: Wendy Webster

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191647578

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 2249

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Did loss of imperial power and the end of empire have any significant impact on British culture and identity after 1945? Within a burgeoning literature on national identity and what it means to be British this is a question that has received surprisingly little attention. Englishness and Empire makes an important and original contribution to recent debates about the domestic consequences of the end of empire. Wendy Webster explores popular narratives of nation in the mainstream media archive - newspapers, newsreels, radio, film, and television. The contours of the study generally follow stories told through prolific filmic and television imagery: the Second World War, the Coronation and Everest, colonial wars of the 1950s, and Winston Churchill's funeral. The book analyses three main narratives that conflicted and collided in the period - a Commonwealth that promised to maintain Britishness as a global identity; siege narratives of colonial wars and immigration that showed a 'little England' threatened by empire and its legacies; and a story of national greatness, celebrating the martial masculinity of British officers and leaders, through which imperial identity leaked into narratives of the Second World War developed after 1945. The book also explores the significance of America to post-imperial Britain. Englishness and Empire considers how far, and in what contexts and unexpected places, imperial identity and loss of imperial power resonated in popular narratives of nataion. As the first monograph to investigate the significance of empire and its legacies in shaping national identity after 1945, this is an important study for all scholars interested in questions of national identity and their intersections with gender, race, empire, immigration, and decolonization.

Better Britons

Reproduction, National Identity, and the Afterlife of Empire

Author: Nadine Attewell

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442667079

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 336

View: 3648

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In 1932, Aldous Huxley published Brave New World, his famous novel about a future in which humans are produced to spec in laboratories. Around the same time, Australian legislators announced an ambitious experiment to “breed the colour” out of Australia by procuring white husbands for women of white and indigenous descent. In this study, Nadine Attewell reflects on an assumption central to these and other policy initiatives and cultural texts from twentieth-century Britain, Australia, and New Zealand: that the fortunes of the nation depend on controlling the reproductive choices of citizen-subjects. Better Britons charts an innovative approach to the politics of reproduction by reading an array of works and discourses – from canonical modernist novels and speculative fictions to government memoranda and public debates – that reflect on the significance of reproductive behaviours for civic, national, and racial identities. Bringing insights from feminist and queer theory into dialogue with work in indigenous studies, Attewell sheds new light on changing conceptions of British and settler identity during the era of decolonization.

Americanizing Britain

The Rise of Modernism in the Age of the Entertainment Empire

Author: Genevieve Abravanel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199942668

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 1499

DOWNLOAD NOW »
How did Great Britain, which entered the twentieth century as a dominant empire, reinvent itself in reaction to its fears and fantasies about the United States? Investigating the anxieties caused by the invasion of American culture-from jazz to Ford motorcars to Hollywood films-during the first half of the twentieth century, Genevieve Abravanel theorizes the rise of the American Entertainment Empire as a new style of imperialism that threatened Britain's own. In the early twentieth century, the United States excited a range of utopian and dystopian energies in Britain. Authors who might ordinarily seem to have little in common-H.G. Wells, Aldous Huxley, and Virginia Woolf-began to imagine Britain's future through America. Abravanel explores how these novelists fashioned transatlantic fictions as a response to the encroaching presence of Uncle Sam. She then turns her attention to the arrival of jazz after World War I, showing how a range of writers, from Elizabeth Bowen to W.H. Auden, deployed the new music as a metaphor for the modernization of England. The global phenomenon of Hollywood film proved even more menacing than the jazz craze, prompting nostalgia for English folk culture and a lament for Britain's literary heritage. Abravanel then refracts British debates about America through the writing of two key cultural critics: F.R. Leavis and T.S. Eliot. In so doing, she demonstrates the interdependencies of some of the most cherished categories of literary study-language, nation, and artistic value-by situating the high-low debates within a transatlantic framework.

The Making of English National Identity

Author: Krishan Kumar

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107320097

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 4417

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Why is English national identity so enigmatic and so elusive? Why, unlike the Scots, Welsh, Irish and most of continental Europe, do the English find it so difficult to say who they are? The Making of English National Identity, first published in 2003, is a fascinating exploration of Englishness and what it means to be English. Drawing on historical, sociological and literary theory, Krishan Kumar examines the rise of English nationalism and issues of race and ethnicity from earliest times to the present day. He argues that the long history of the English as an imperial people has, as with other imperial people like the Russians and the Austrians, developed a sense of missionary nationalism which in the interests of unity and empire has necessitated the repression of ordinary expressions of nationalism. Professor Kumar's lively and provocative approach challenges readers to reconsider their pre-conceptions about national identity and who the English really are.

Contact in Context

Author: Sandhya Patel

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1443865508

Category: Travel

Page: 175

View: 4347

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Contact between cultures has been understood in various ways and this particular volume considers the European cultural, social, scientific, philosophical and political contexts framing encounter. All of the essays thus look at the different ways in which individuals and institutions work these contexts into their representations of contact settings. In Part 1, the conventional stance is adopted where encounter is understood as taking place elsewhere and not on European soil. The chapters examine contact far afield and focus on how public and private contexts act upon ensuing interpretations and representations of inter-cultural interaction. Part 2 considers ‘contact within’, positing inversed sites of encounter. The essays point to the arrival of these discovered peoples on European soil as the eras of exploration ushered in periods of settlement and extended colonisation. The paradigm of contact between Europeans and Others (and Other spaces) was thus displaced both figuratively and literally. Amongst the conduits for such representations were the mid-nineteenth and early twentieth century European exhibitions or fairs. The studies here suggest that these encounters were also engineered by domestic contexts which gradually enclosed interaction within further, restrictive conceptual frameworks, not on islands and beaches, but in European towns and cities.

Scottish Literature and Postcolonial Literature

Author: Michael Gardiner

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 074868865X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 4593

DOWNLOAD NOW »
The first full-length study of Scottish literature using a post-devolutionary understanding of postcolonial studies

What’s Left of Blackness

Feminisms, Transracial Solidarities, and the Politics of Belonging in Britain

Author: T. Fisher

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137038438

Category: Social Science

Page: 189

View: 6269

DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book analyzes the political transformations in black women's socially engaged community-based political work in England in the late twentieth century. It situates these shifts alongside Britain's political economy and against the discourse and deployment of blackness as a political imaginary in which to engage in struggles for social justice.

Muslim Political Participation in Europe

Author: Jorgen S Nielsen

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748677534

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 5541

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Analyses European Muslim communities' developing involvement in their political environment and related Muslim and public debates.

Modernism and Nostalgia

Bodies, Locations, Aesthetics

Author: T. Clewell

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137326603

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 273

View: 6557

DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book addresses the multiple meanings of nostalgia in the literature of the period. Whether depicted as an emotion, remembrance, or fixation, these essays demonstrate that the nostalgic impulse reveals how deeply rooted in the damaged, the old, and the vanishing, were the variety of efforts to imagine and produce the new—the distinctly modern.

The Victorian Colonial Romance with the Antipodes

Author: H. Blythe

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137397837

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 243

View: 5432

DOWNLOAD NOW »
This study treats the Victorian Antipodes as a compelling site of romance and satire for middle-class writers who went to New Zealand between 1840 and 1872. Blythe's research fits with the rising study of settler colonialism and highlights the intersection of late-Victorian ideas and post-colonial theories.