Mound Sites of the Ancient South

A Guide to the Mississippian Chiefdoms

Author: Eric E. Bowne

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820345776

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

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From approximately AD 900 to 1600, ancient Mississippian culture dominated today’s southeastern United States. These Native American societies, known more popularly as moundbuilders, had populations that numbered in the thousands, produced vast surpluses of food, engaged in longdistance trading, and were ruled by powerful leaders who raised large armies. Mississippian chiefdoms built fortified towns with massive earthen structures used as astrological monuments and burial grounds. The remnants of these cities—scattered throughout the Southeast from Florida north to Wisconsin and as far west as Texas—are still visible and awe-inspiring today. This heavily illustrated guide brings these settlements to life with maps, artists’ reconstructions, photos of artifacts, and historic and modern photos of sites, connecting our archaeological knowledge with what is visible when visiting the sites today. Anthropologist Eric E. Bowne discusses specific structures at each location and highlights noteworthy museums, artifacts, and cultural features. He also provides an introduction to Mississippian culture, offering background on subsistence and settlement practices, political and social organization, warfare, and belief systems that will help readers better understand these complex and remarkable places. Sites include Cahokia, Moundville, Etowah, and many more.

Cahokia

Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi

Author: Timothy R. Pauketat

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101105178

Category: History

Page: 208

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The fascinating story of a lost city and an unprecedented American civilization While Mayan and Aztec civilizations are widely known and documented, relatively few people are familiar with the largest prehistoric Native American city north of Mexico-a site that expert Timothy Pauketat brings vividly to life in this groundbreaking book. Almost a thousand years ago, a city flourished along the Mississippi River near what is now St. Louis. Built around a sprawling central plaza and known as Cahokia, the site has drawn the attention of generations of archaeologists, whose work produced evidence of complex celestial timepieces, feasts big enough to feed thousands, and disturbing signs of human sacrifice. Drawing on these fascinating finds, Cahokia presents a lively and astonishing narrative of prehistoric America.

Archeology of Mississippi

Author: Calvin S. Brown

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781617033490

Category:

Page: 554

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This reprinting makes available again the only book of its kind to be focused upon the prehistoric Indians of Mississippi. Although written expressly for the layreader, it has continued for more than eighty years to appeal to a wide audience that ranges from professional archeologists and scholars to weekend artifact collectors.Published originally in 1926, Archeology of Mississippi details Brown's records collected during more than a decade of research. Anyone wishing to investigate archeology in Mississippi must start with this book. As early as 1912 Brown, a professor of romance languages at the University of Mississippi, began taking photographs of Mississippi Indian mounds. His are the only photographic records of certain cultural sites that have since then been drastically altered.

The Moundbuilders

Ancient Peoples of Eastern North America

Author: George R. Milner

Publisher: London : Thames & Hudson

ISBN: 9780500284681

Category: History

Page: 224

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Hailed by Bruce D. Smith, Curator of North American Archaeology at the Smithsonian Institution, as without question the best available book on the pre-Columbian Indian societies of eastern North America, this wide-ranging and copiously illustrated volume covers the entire sweep of Eastern Woodlands prehistory, with an emphasis on how these societies developed from hunter-gatherers to village farmers and town-dwellers.

Ancient Objects and Sacred Realms

Interpretations of Mississippian Iconography

Author: F. Kent Reilly, III,James F. Garber

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292774407

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 657

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Between AD 900-1600, the native peoples of the Mississippi River Valley and other areas of the Eastern Woodlands of the United States conceived and executed one of the greatest artistic traditions of the Precolumbian Americas. Created in the media of copper, shell, stone, clay, and wood, and incised or carved with a complex set of symbols and motifs, this seven-hundred-year-old artistic tradition functioned within a multiethnic landscape centered on communities dominated by earthen mounds and plazas. Previous researchers have referred to this material as the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex (SECC). This groundbreaking volume brings together ten essays by leading anthropologists, archaeologists, and art historians, who analyze the iconography of Mississippian art in order to reconstruct the ritual activities, cosmological vision, and ideology of these ancient precursors to several groups of contemporary Native Americans. Significantly, the authors correlate archaeological, ethnographic, and art historical data that illustrate the stylistic differences within Mississippian art as well as the numerous changes that occur through time. The research also demonstrates the inadequacy of the SECC label, since Mississippian art is not limited to the Southeast and reflects stylistic changes over time among several linked but distinct religious traditions. The term Mississippian Iconographic Interaction Sphere (MIIS) more adequately describes the corpus of this Mississippian art. Most important, the authors illustrate the overarching nature of the ancient Native American religious system, as a creation unique to the native American cultures of the eastern United States.

The Southeastern Indians

Author: Charles M. Hudson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780870492488

Category: History

Page: 573

View: 3720

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A broad introduction to the prehistory, social institutions, and history of the native people of the southeastern United States

Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun

Hernando de Soto and the South's Ancient Chiefdoms

Author: Charles Hudson

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820351601

Category: History

Page: 600

View: 4480

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Between 1539 and 1542 Hernando de Soto led a small army on a desperate journey of exploration of almost four thousand miles across the U. S. Southeast. Until the 1998 publication of Charles M. Hudson's foundational Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun, De Soto's path had been one of history's most intriguing mysteries. With this book, anthropologist Charles Hudson offers a solution to the question, ?Where did de Soto go? Using a new route reconstruction, for the first time the story of the de Soto expedition can be laid on a map, and in many instances it can be tied to specific archaeological sites. Arguably the most important event in the history of the Southeast in the sixteenth century, De Soto's journey cut a bloody and indelible swath across both the landscape and native cultures in a quest for gold and personal glory. The desperate Spanish army followed the sunset from Florida to Texas before abandoning its mission. De Soto's one triumph was that he was the first European to explore the vast region that would be the American South, but he died on the banks of the Mississippi River a broken man in 1542. With a new foreword by Robbie Ethridge reflecting on the continuing influence of this now classic text, the twentieth-anniversary edition of Knights is a clearly written narrative that unfolds against the exotic backdrop of a now extinct social and geographic landscape. Hudson masterfully chronicles both De Soto's expedition and the native societies he visited. A blending of archaeology, history, and historical geography, this is a monumental study of the sixteenth-century Southeast.

Visualizing the Sacred

Cosmic Visions, Regionalism, and the Art of the Mississippian World

Author: George E. Lankford,F. Kent Reilly,James F. Garber

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292768087

Category: Social Science

Page: 375

View: 5251

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The prehistoric native peoples of the Mississippi River Valley and other areas of the Eastern Woodlands of the United States shared a complex set of symbols and motifs that constituted one of the greatest artistic traditions of the pre-Columbian Americas. Traditionally known as the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex, these artifacts of copper, shell, stone, clay, and wood were the subject of the groundbreaking 2007 book Ancient Objects and Sacred Realms: Interpretations of Mississippian Iconography, which presented a major reconstruction of the rituals, cosmology, ideology, and political structures of the Mississippian peoples. Visualizing the Sacred advances the study of Mississippian iconography by delving into the regional variations within what is now known as the Mississippian Iconographic Interaction Sphere (MIIS). Bringing archaeological, ethnographic, ethnohistoric, and iconographic perspectives to the analysis of Mississippian art, contributors from several disciplines discuss variations in symbols and motifs among major sites and regions across a wide span of time and also consider what visual symbols reveal about elite status in diverse political environments. These findings represent the first formal identification of style regions within the Mississippian Iconographic Interaction Sphere and call for a new understanding of the MIIS as a network of localized, yet interrelated religious systems that experienced both continuity and change over time.

Archaeology of the Mississippian Culture

A Research Guide

Author: Peter Neal Peregrine

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780815303367

Category: History

Page: 192

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Twenty-nine collected essays represent a critical history of Shakespeare's play as text and as theater, beginning with Samuel Johnson in 1765, and ending with a review of the Royal Shakespeare Company production in 1991. The criticism centers on three aspects of the play: the love/friendship debate.

Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection [4 volumes]

Author: Peg A. Lamphier,Rosanne Welch

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1610696034

Category: Social Science

Page: 1828

View: 1177

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This four-volume set documents the complexity and richness of women's contributions to American history and culture, empowering all students by demonstrating a more populist approach to the past. • Provides significantly more detail than typical reference works on women's history and culture, enabling readers to better appreciate the contributions of women of all socio-cultural statuses • Covers the astounding range of American women's experience, including women of various economic and racial statuses, religious affiliations, political and ideological identifications, and sexualities • Includes a significant selection of primary documents, thereby combining the educational power of secondary and primary literature to create a richer learning experience for users

Chiefdoms and Other Archaeological Delusions

Author: Timothy R. Pauketat

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN: 9780759108288

Category: Social Science

Page: 257

View: 6182

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This book sweeps away the last vestiges of social-evolutionary explanations of 'chiefdoms' by rethinking the history of Pre-Columbian Southeast peoples and comparing them to ancient peoples in the Southwest, Mexico, Mesoamerica, and Mesopotamia.

Ocmulgee National Monument

Author: Matthew Jennings

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 143965252X

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 1910

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People have called the land near the Ocmulgee River in present-day central Georgia home for a long time, perhaps as many as 17,000 years, and each successive group has left its mark on the landscape. Mississippian-era people erected the towering Great Temple Mound and other large earthworks around 1,000 years ago. In the late 17th century, Ocmulgee flourished as a center of trade between the Creek Indians and their English neighbors. In the 19th century, railroads did irreparable damage to the site in the name of progress and profit, slicing through it twice. Preservation efforts bore fruit in the 1930s, when Ocmulgee National Monument was created. Since then, people from all over the world have visited Ocmulgee. They come for many reasons, but they invariably leave with a reverence for the place and the people who built it hundreds of years ago and those who have maintained it in recent decades.

Ancient Complex Societies

Author: Jennifer C. Ross,Sharon R. Steadman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315305615

Category: Social Science

Page: 440

View: 8326

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Ancient Complex Societies examines the archaeological evidence for the rise and functioning of politically and socially “complex” cultures in antiquity. Particular focus is given to civilizations exhibiting positions of leadership, social and administrative hierarchies, emerging and already developed complex religious systems, and economic differentiation. Case studies are drawn from around the globe, including Asia, the Mediterranean region, and the American continents. Using case studies from Africa, Polynesia, and North America, discussion is dedicated to identifying what “complex” means and when it should be applied to ancient systems. Each chapter attempts to not only explore the sociopolitical and economic elements of ancient civilizations, but to also present an overview of what life was like for the later population within each system, sometimes drilling down to individual people living their daily lives. Throughout the chapters, the authors address problems with the idea of complexity, the incomparability of cultures, and the inconsistency of archaeological and historical evidence in reconstructing ancient cultures.

Forging Southeastern Identities

Social Archaeology, Ethnohistory, and Folklore of the Mississippian to Early Historic South

Author: Gregory A. Waselkov,Marvin T. Smith

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817319417

Category: History

Page: 299

View: 5808

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Forging Southeastern Identities explores the many ways archaeologists and ethnohistorians define and trace the origins of Native Americans' collective social identity.

Cahokia Mounds

America's First City

Author: William R. Iseminger

Publisher: History Press (SC)

ISBN: 9781596297340

Category: History

Page: 174

View: 1719

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About one thousand years ago, a phenomenon occurred in a fertile tract of Mississippi River flood plain known today as the American Bottom."? This phenomenon came to be called Cahokia Mounds, America's first city. Interpreting the rich heritage of a site like Cahokia Mounds is a balancing act; the interpreter must speak as a scholar to the general public on behalf of an entirely different civilization. Since even those three groups are splintered into myriad dialects of perspective, sometimes it is hard to know what language to use. But William Iseminger's work at the site has given him nearly four decades of practice in Cahokia Conversation 101, and he tells the story of the place and its ancient culture (as well as its place in contemporary culture) with the clarity and confidence of a native speaker."

Picture Cave

Unraveling the Mysteries of the Mississippian Cosmos

Author: Carol Diaz-Granados,James R. Duncan,F. Kent Reilly, III

Publisher: Linda Schele Series in Maya an

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 1079

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A millennia ago, Native Americans entered the dark recesses of a cave in eastern Missouri and painted an astonishing array of human, animal, and supernatural creatures on its walls. Known as Picture Cave, it was a hallowed site for sacred rituals and rites of passage, for explaining the multi-layered cosmos, for vision quests, for communing with spirits in the "other world," and for burying the dead. The number, variety, and complexity of images make Picture Cave one of the most significant prehistoric sites in North America, similar in importance to Cahokia and Chaco Canyon. Indeed, scholars will be able to use it to reconstruct much of the Native American symbolism of the early Western Mississippian world. The Picture Cave Interdisciplinary Project brought together specialists in American Indian art and iconography, two artists, Osage Indian elders, a museum curator, a folklorist, and an internationally renowned cave archaeologist to produce the first complete documentation of the pictographs on the cave walls and the first interpretations of their meanings and significance. This extensively illustrated volume presents the Project's findings, including an introduction to Picture Cave and prehistoric cave art and technical analyses of pigments, radiocarbon dating, spatial order, and archaeological remains. Interpretations of the cave's imagery, from individual motifs to complex panels; the responses of contemporary artists; and interviews with Osage elders (descendants of the people who made the art), describing what Picture Cave means to them today, are also included. A visual glossary of all the images in Picture Cave as well as panoramic views complete this pathfinding volume.

Ancient Cahokia and the Mississippians

Author: Timothy R. Pauketat

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521520669

Category: History

Page: 218

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Using a wealth of archaeological evidence, this book outlines the development of Mississippian civilization.

The Westo Indians

Slave Traders of the Early Colonial South

Author: Eric E. Bowne

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817351787

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 5456

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The Westo Indians, who lived in the Savannah River region during the second half of the 17th century, are believed to have had a profound effect on the development of the colonial South. This volume reproduces excerpts from all 19 documents that indisputably reference the Westos, although the Europeans referred to them by a variety of names.

From Chicaza to Chickasaw

The European Invasion and the Transformation of the Mississippian World, 1540-1715

Author: Robbie Ethridge

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807899335

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 1906

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In this sweeping regional history, anthropologist Robbie Ethridge traces the metamorphosis of the Native South from first contact in 1540 to the dawn of the eighteenth century, when indigenous people no longer lived in a purely Indian world but rather on the edge of an expanding European empire. Using a framework that Ethridge calls the "Mississippian shatter zone" to explicate these tumultuous times, From Chicaza to Chickasaw examines the European invasion, the collapse of the precontact Mississippian world, and the restructuring of discrete chiefdoms into coalescent Native societies in a colonial world. The story of one group--the Chickasaws--is closely followed through this period.