First Along the River

A Brief History of the U.S. Environmental Movement

Author: Benjamin Kline

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 1442203994

Category: History

Page: 227

View: 6356

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First Along the River introduces students to the U.S. environmental movement. Concise, accessible, and informative, this book provides students with a balanced, historical perspective on the history of the environmental movement in relation to major social and political events in U.S. history. The book highlights important people and events, places critical concepts in context, and shows the impact of government, industry, and population on the American landscape. The fourth edition includes a new chapter that covers the entire environmental record of the George W. Bush administration, and the early record of the Obama administration.

First Along the River

A Brief History of the U.S. Environmental Movement

Author: Benjamin Kline

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 1442204001

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 731

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First Along the River provides students with a balanced, historical perspective on the history of the environmental movement in relation to major social and political events in U.S. history, from the pre-colonial era to the present. The book highlights important people and events, places critical concepts in context, and shows the impact of government, industry, and population on the American landscape. Comprehensive yet brief, First Along the River discusses the religious and philosophical beliefs that shaped Americans' relationship to the environment, traces the origins and development of government regulations that impact Americans' use of natural resources, and shows why popular environmental groups were founded and how they changed over time. The fourth edition includes up-to-date coverage of the environmental movement and developments since 2000, including the second term of George W. Bush and the administration of Barack Obama.

First Along the River

A Brief History of the U.S. Environmental Movement

Author: Benjamin Kline

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742558533

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 3109

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First Along the River is the premier text that introduces students to the U.S. environmental movement. Concise, accessible, and informative, this third edition has been updated to include a new chapter addressing environmental issues in the post 9/11 world, policy shifts under the Bush administration, climate change, and the future of environmental movements. First Along the River provides students with a balanced, historical perspective on the history of the environmental movement in relation to major social and political events in U.S. history. The book highlights important people and events, places critical concepts in context, and shows the impact of government, industry, and population on the American landscape. Comprehensive yet brief, First Along the River discusses the religious and philosophical beliefs that shaped Americans' relationship to the environment, traces the origins and development of government regulations that impact Americans' use of natural resources, and shows why popular environmental groups were founded and how they changed over time.

First Along the River

A Brief History of the U.S. Environmental Movement

Author: Benjamin Kline

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9780742558533

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 9865

DOWNLOAD NOW »
First Along the River is the premier text that introduces students to the U.S. environmental movement. Concise, accessible, and informative, this third edition has been updated to include a new chapter addressing environmental issues in the post 9/11 world, policy shifts under the Bush administration, climate change, and the future of environmental movements. First Along the River provides students with a balanced, historical perspective on the history of the environmental movement in relation to major social and political events in U.S. history. The book highlights important people and events, places critical concepts in context, and shows the impact of government, industry, and population on the American landscape. Comprehensive yet brief, First Along the River discusses the religious and philosophical beliefs that shaped Americans' relationship to the environment, traces the origins and development of government regulations that impact Americans' use of natural resources, and shows why popular environmental groups were founded and how they changed over time.

Humans in the Landscape

An Introduction to Environmental Studies

Author: Kai N. Lee,William Freudenburg,Richard Howarth

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393930726

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 3879

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This is the first textbook to fully synthesize all key disciplines of environmental studies. Humans in the Landscape draws on the biophysical sciences, social sciences, and humanities to explore the interactions between cultures and environments over time, and discusses classic environmental problems in the context of the overarching conflicts and frameworks that motivate them.

The Big Smoke (Routledge Revivals)

A History of Air Pollution in London since Medieval Times

Author: Peter Brimblecombe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136703292

Category: Social Science

Page: 202

View: 5548

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First published in 1987, Peter Brimblecombe's book provides an engaging historical account of air pollution in London, offering a fascinating insight into the development of air pollution controls against a changing social and economic background. He examines domestic and industrial pollution and their effects on fashions, furnishings, buildings and human health. The book ends with an intriguing analysis of the dangers arising from contemporary pollutants and a glimpse of what the future may hold for London.

American Environmentalism

Readings in Conservation History

Author: Roderick Nash

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities Social

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 3863

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This collection of readings contains comprehensive primary and secondary works in the field of conservation, emphasizes the history of ideas and attitudes about conservation, and gives a chronology of important conservation events in U.S. history from the beginning to the present. Edited by a national leader in the fields of conservation, environmental management, and education, this well-organized anthology is appropriate for courses dealing with American environmental studies and ecology.

Scrambling for Africa

AIDS, Expertise, and the Rise of American Global Health Science

Author: Johanna Tayloe Crane

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801469058

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 9462

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Countries in sub-Saharan Africa were once dismissed by Western experts as being too poor and chaotic to benefit from the antiretroviral drugs that transformed the AIDS epidemic in the United States and Europe. Today, however, the region is courted by some of the most prestigious research universities in the world as they search for “resource-poor” hospitals in which to base their international HIV research and global health programs. In Scrambling for Africa, Johanna Tayloe Crane reveals how, in the space of merely a decade, Africa went from being a continent largely excluded from advancements in HIV medicine to an area of central concern and knowledge production within the increasingly popular field of global health science. Drawing on research conducted in the U.S. and Uganda during the mid-2000s, Crane provides a fascinating ethnographic account of the transnational flow of knowledge, politics, and research money—as well as blood samples, viruses, and drugs. She takes readers to underfunded Ugandan HIV clinics as well as to laboratories and conference rooms in wealthy American cities like San Francisco and Seattle where American and Ugandan experts struggle to forge shared knowledge about the AIDS epidemic. The resulting uncomfortable mix of preventable suffering, humanitarian sentiment, and scientific ambition shows how global health research partnerships may paradoxically benefit from the very inequalities they aspire to redress. A work of outstanding interdisciplinary scholarship, Scrambling for Africa will be of interest to audiences in anthropology, science and technology studies, African studies, and the medical humanities.

Protecting New Jersey's Environment

From Cancer Alley to the New Garden State

Author: Thomas J. Belton

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 081354887X

Category: Nature

Page: 250

View: 4163

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In Protecting New Jersey's Environment, critical environmental concerns translate into real human interest stories about people and their surroundings in the state -- a critical site for the growth of environmentalism. The book explores the science underpinning environmental issues and the public policy infighting that goes undocumented behind the scenes and beneath the controversies. It demonstrates the ways that scientists, regulators, lobbyists, and politicians interact and offers the public a go-to guide on how to seek environmental protection in practical ways.

Encounters with the Archdruid

Narratives About a Conservationist and Three of His Natural Enemies

Author: John McPhee

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0374708630

Category: Nature

Page: 256

View: 9544

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The narratives in this book are of journeys made in three wildernesses - on a coastal island, in a Western mountain range, and on the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. The four men portrayed here have different relationships to their environment, and they encounter each other on mountain trails, in forests and rapids, sometimes with reserve, sometimes with friendliness, sometimes fighting hard across a philosophical divide.

Natural Visions

The Power of Images in American Environmental Reform

Author: Finis Dunaway

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022645424X

Category: Political Science

Page: 280

View: 2692

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Walden Pond. The Grand Canyon.Yosemite National Park. Throughout the twentieth century, photographers and filmmakers created unforgettable images of these and other American natural treasures. Many of these images, including the work of Ansel Adams, continue to occupy a prominent place in the American imagination. Making these representations, though, was more than a purely aesthetic project. In fact, portraying majestic scenes and threatened places galvanized concern for the environment and its protection. Natural Visions documents through images the history of environmental reform from the Progressive era to the first Earth Day celebration in 1970, showing the crucial role the camera played in the development of the conservation movement. In Natural Visions, Finis Dunaway tells the story of how visual imagery—such as wilderness photographs, New Deal documentary films, and Sierra Club coffee-table books—shaped modern perceptions of the natural world. By examining the relationship between the camera and environmental politics through detailed studies of key artists and activists, Dunaway captures the emotional and spiritual meaning that became associated with the American landscape. Throughout the book, he reveals how photographers and filmmakers adapted longstanding traditions in American culture—the Puritan jeremiad, the romantic sublime, and the frontier myth—to literally picture nature as a place of grace for the individual and the nation. Beautifully illustrated with photographs by Ansel Adams, Eliot Porter, and a host of other artists, Natural Visions will appeal to a wide range of readers interested in American cultural history, the visual arts, and environmentalism.

The Origins of AIDS

Author: Jacques Pepin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139501410

Category: Medical

Page: N.A

View: 8984

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It is now thirty years since the discovery of AIDS but its origins continue to puzzle doctors and scientists. Inspired by his own experiences working as an infectious diseases physician in Africa, Jacques Pepin looks back to the early twentieth-century events in Africa that triggered the emergence of HIV/AIDS and traces its subsequent development into the most dramatic and destructive epidemic of modern times. He shows how the disease was first transmitted from chimpanzees to man and then how urbanization, prostitution, and large-scale colonial medical campaigns intended to eradicate tropical diseases combined to disastrous effect to fuel the spread of the virus from its origins in Léopoldville to the rest of Africa, the Caribbean and ultimately worldwide. This is an essential new perspective on HIV/AIDS and on the lessons that must be learnt if we are to avoid provoking another pandemic in the future.

Drama of Color

Improvisation with Multiethnic Folklore

Author: Johnny Saldaña

Publisher: Heinemann Drama

ISBN: 9780435086671

Category: Education

Page: 169

View: 9903

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Theatre is often perceived as elitist, something reserved for the affluent mainstream. But all children can be given the opportunity to explore dramatic art if individual teachers choose to integrate these experiences into their curriculum. Johnny Saldana's Drama of Color is a unique resource for using drama to enhance K-6 children's ethnic literacy by provoking personal insights into the multiethnic world in which we live. Multiethnic folklore - specifically Hispanic, Native American, Asian and Pacific Islander, and African/African American - becomes a springboard for examining different ethnic perspectives and world views and dispelling stereotypes along the way.

The Significance of the Frontier in American History

Author: Frederick Jackson Turner

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 014196331X

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 8568

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This hugely influential work marked a turning point in US history and culture, arguing that the nation’s expansion into the Great West was directly linked to its unique spirit: a rugged individualism forged at the juncture between civilization and wilderness, which – for better or worse – lies at the heart of American identity today. Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves – and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives – and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization and helped make us who we are.

Rising Tide

The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How It Changed America

Author: John M. Barry

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416563326

Category: Social Science

Page: 528

View: 4962

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An American epic of science, politics, race, honor, high society, and the Mississippi River, Rising Tide tells the riveting and nearly forgotten story of the greatest natural disaster this country has ever known -- the Mississippi flood of 1927. The river inundated the homes of nearly one million people, helped elect Huey Long governor and made Herbert Hoover president, drove hundreds of thousands of blacks north, and transformed American society and politics forever. A New York Times Notable Book of the Year, winner of the Southern Book Critics Circle Award and the Lillian Smith Award.

American Environmental History

An Introduction

Author: Carolyn Merchant

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231140355

Category: Political Science

Page: 480

View: 2010

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By studying the many ways diverse peoples have changed, shaped, and conserved the natural world over time, environmental historians provide insight into humanity's unique relationship with nature and, more importantly, are better able to understand the origins of our current environmental crisis. Beginning with the precolonial land-use practice of Native Americans and concluding with our twenty-first century concerns over our global ecological crisis, American Environmental History addresses contentious issues such as the preservation of the wilderness, the expulsion of native peoples from national parks, and population growth, and considers the formative forces of gender, race, and class. Entries address a range of topics, from the impact of rice cultivation, slavery, and the growth of the automobile suburb to the effects of the Russian sea otter trade, Columbia River salmon fisheries, the environmental justice movement, and globalization. This illustrated reference is an essential companion for students interested in the ongoing transformation of the American landscape and the conflicts over its resources and conservation. It makes rich use of the tools and resources (climatic and geological data, court records, archaeological digs, and the writings of naturalists) that environmental historians rely on to conduct their research. The volume also includes a compendium of significant people, concepts, events, agencies, and legislation, and an extensive bibliography of critical films, books, and Web sites.

The Future

Six Drivers of Global Change

Author: Al Gore

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN: 0812992946

Category: Social Science

Page: 558

View: 4416

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The former vice president and #1 best-selling author of An Inconvenient Truth offers a frank assessment of six critical drivers of global change in the decades to come—economic globalization, worldwide digital communications, a growing balance of global power, unsustainable population growth, scientific revolution and disruption of ecosystems.

The Land Was Ours

How Black Beaches Became White Wealth in the Coastal South

Author: Andrew W. Kahrl

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469628732

Category: Social Science

Page: 374

View: 6316

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The coasts of today's American South feature luxury condominiums, resorts, and gated communities, yet just a century ago, a surprising amount of beachfront property in the Chesapeake, along the Carolina shores, and around the Gulf of Mexico was owned and populated by African Americans. Blending social and environmental history, Andrew W. Kahrl tells the story of African American–owned beaches in the twentieth century. By reconstructing African American life along the coast, Kahrl demonstrates just how important these properties were for African American communities and leisure, as well as for economic empowerment, especially during the era of the Jim Crow South. However, in the wake of the civil rights movement and amid the growing prosperity of the Sunbelt, many African Americans fell victim to effective campaigns to dispossess black landowners of their properties and beaches. Kahrl makes a signal contribution to our understanding of African American landowners and real-estate developers, as well as the development of coastal capitalism along the southern seaboard, tying the creation of overdeveloped, unsustainable coastlines to the unmaking of black communities and cultures along the shore. The result is a skillful appraisal of the ambiguous legacy of racial progress in the Sunbelt.