Exploring White Privilege

Author: Robert P. Amico

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315402289

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 305

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Exploring white privilege is an enterprise few of us who identify as white have attempted. White privilege is a foreign territory to us, although an unpleasantly familiar territory to people of color. At first the exploration can seem threatening, frightening and uncomfortable because, like any exploration, it can shatter the way we look at the world and how we understand ourselves. This book is, in part, a personal exploration of the author’s white privilege and how he sought to transcend it. It is also a sociological analysis of white privilege, drawing upon key social science literature. The book is an invaluable tool for personal and group explorations of racial privilege as well as other forms of privilege, including gender. Exploring White Privilege offers an analysis of white privilege as well as numerous examples of systemic white privilege in the U.S. Amico explains the cognitive and emotive factors that play a role in making it difficult for most white Americans to understand, learn and accept the sociological facts about systemic racism. While white privilege is generally understood as a system that benefits white people, Amico investigates the psychological, social and spiritual costs of white privilege to white people. And with a deeper understanding of how white privilege affects us all, questions of moral responsibility and accountability are investigated through personal anecdotes. The author offers a moral argument that is a call to action within our individual spheres of influence. The benefits of such a commitment to action are then explored and compared to the costs of inaction. Exploring white privilege can lead to social change. Amico offers a variety of tools for the reader interested in such explorations of their white privilege.

Waking Up White, and Finding Myself in the Story of Race

Author: Debby Irving

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780991331307

Category: Racism

Page: 273

View: 1959

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For twenty-five years, Debby Irving sensed inexplicable racial tensions in her personal and professional relationships. As a colleague and neighbor, she worried about offending people she dearly wanted to befriend. As an arts administrator, she didn't understand why her diversity efforts lacked traction. As a teacher, she found her best efforts to reach out to students and families of color left her wondering what she was missing. Then, in 2009, one "aha!" moment launched an adventure of discovery and insight that drastically shifted her worldview and upended her life plan. In Waking Up White, Irving tells her often cringe-worthy story with such openness that readers will turn every page rooting for her-and ultimately for all of us.

White Fragility

Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism

Author: Robin DiAngelo

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807047414

Category: FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS

Page: 192

View: 8034

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Explores counterproductive reactions white people have when discussing racism that serve to protect their positions and maintain racial inequality.

White Privilege

Author: Paula S. Rothenberg

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9781429206600

Category: Social Science

Page: 182

View: 3187

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Studies of racism often focus on its devastating effects on the victims of prejudice. But no discussion of race is complete without exploring the other side--the ways in which some people or groups actually benefit, deliberately or inadvertently, from racial bias. This is the subject of Paula Rothenberg's groundbreaking anthology, White Privilege. The new edition of White Privilege once again challenges readers to explore ideas for using the power and the concept of white privilege to help combat racism in their own lives, and includes key essays and articles by Peggy McIntosh, Richard Dyer, bell hooks, Robert Jensen, Allan G. Johnson, and others. Three additional essays add new levels of complexity to our understanding of the paradoxical nature of white privilege and the politics and economics that lie behind the social construction of whiteness, making this edition an even better choice for educators. Brief, inexpensive, and easily integrated with other texts, this interdisciplinary collection of commonsense, non-rhetorical readings lets educators incorporate discussions of whiteness and white privilege into a variety of disciplines, including sociology, English composition, psychology, social work, women's studies, political science, and American studies.

The Great White North?

Exploring Whiteness, Privilege, and Identity in Education

Author: Paul Ralph Carr,Darren Ernie Lund

Publisher: Sense Pub

ISBN: 9789087901424

Category: Education

Page: 244

View: 8141

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This landmark book represents the first text to pay critical and sustained attention to Whiteness in Canada from an impressive line-up of leading scholars and activists. The burgeoning scholarship on Whiteness will benefit richly from this book's timely inclusion of the insights of Canadian scholars, educators, activists and others working for social justice within and through the educational system, with implications far beyond national borders. Naming Whiteness and White identity is a political project as much as an intellectual engagement, and the co-editors of this collection must be commended for creating the space for such naming to take place in public and academic discourses. Is it noteworthy to acknowledge that both Paul and Darren are White, and that they are overseeing this work on Whiteness? I believe that it is, not because others cannot write about the subject with clarity and insight, as is clearly evident in the diverse range of contributors to this book. Rather, naming their positions as White allies embracing a rigorous conceptual and analytical discourse in the social justice field is an important signal that White society must also become intertwined in the entrenched racism that infuses every aspect of our society. As Paul and Darren correctly point out, race is still a pivotal concern for everything that happens in society, and especially in schools. Excerpt from the Foreword by George J. Sefa Dei Professor and Chair, Department of Sociology and Equity Studies, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE/UT) The Great White North? provides a timely and important mode of addressing and examining the contradictions of Whiteness, and also challenging its insinuation into the very pores of the Canadian social universe. While the context of the book is distinctly Canadian, there are urgent messages here on race and anti-racism for the international community. Carr and Lund have provided educators with a vibrant contribution to the critical anti-racist literature. This is a book that needs to be put on reading- lists across the disciplines! Peter McLaren Professor, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies University of California at Los Angeles

Blackass

A Novel

Author: A. Igoni Barrett

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1555977332

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 3839

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"First published in 2015 by Chatto & Windus, an imprint of Vintage/ Penguin Random House UK, London"--Title page verso.

White Like Me

Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son

Author: Tim Wise

Publisher: Soft Skull Press

ISBN: 1593764707

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 208

View: 1651

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With a new preface and updated chapters, White Like Me is one-part memoir, one-part polemical essay collection. It is a personal examination of the way in which racial privilege shapes the daily lives of white Americans in every realm: employment, education, housing, criminal justice, and elsewhere. Using stories from his own life, Tim Wise demonstrates the ways in which racism not only burdens people of color, but also benefits, in relative terms, those who are “white like him.” He discusses how racial privilege can harm whites in the long run and make progressive social change less likely. He explores the ways in which whites can challenge their unjust privileges, and explains in clear and convincing language why it is in the best interest of whites themselves to do so. Using anecdotes instead of stale statistics, Wise weaves a narrative that is at once readable and yet scholarly, analytical and yet accessible.

Making Meaning of Whiteness

Exploring Racial Identity with White Teachers

Author: Alice McIntyre

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791434956

Category: Education

Page: 193

View: 565

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Describes how a group of white female student teachers examined their "whiteness" and developed ways of thinking critically about race and racism in educational practice.

Playing While White

Privilege and Power on and off the Field

Author: David J. Leonard

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295741899

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 320

View: 9402

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Playing While White argues that whiteness matters in sports culture, both on and off the field. Offering critical analysis of athletic stars such as Johnny Manziel, Marshall Henderson, Jordan Spieth, Lance Armstrong, Josh Hamilton, as well as the predominantly white cultures of NASCAR and extreme sports, David Leonard identifies how whiteness is central to the commodification of athletes and the sports they play. Leonard demonstrates that sporting cultures are a key site in the trafficking of racial ideas, narratives, and ideologies. He identifies how white athletes are frequently characterized as intelligent leaders who are presumed innocent of the kinds of transgressions black athletes are often pathologized for. With an analysis of the racial dynamics of sports traditions as varied as football, cycling, hockey, baseball, tennis, snowboarding, and soccer, as well as the reception and media portrayals of specific white athletes, Leonard examines how and why whiteness matters within sports and what that tells us about race in the twenty-first century United States.

White Out

Understanding White Privilege and Dominance in the Modern Age

Author: Christopher S. Collins,Alexander Jun

Publisher: Peter Lang Incorporated, International Academic Publishers

ISBN: 9781433135415

Category:

Page: 124

View: 2090

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White Out: Understanding White Privilege and Dominance in the Modern Age is about the role of Whiteness and a defense of White dominance in an increasingly diverse society

Revealing Whiteness

The Unconscious Habits of Racial Privilege

Author: Shannon Sullivan

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253112132

Category: Philosophy

Page: 264

View: 7760

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"[A] lucid discussion of race that does not sell out the black experience." -- Tommy Lott, author of The Invention of Race Revealing Whiteness explores how white privilege operates as an unseen, invisible, and unquestioned norm in society today. In this personal and selfsearching book, Shannon Sullivan interrogates her own whiteness and how being white has affected her. By looking closely at the subtleties of white domination, she issues a call for other white people to own up to their unspoken privilege and confront environments that condone or perpetuate it. Sullivan's theorizing about race and privilege draws on American pragmatism, psychology, race theory, and feminist thought. As it articulates a way to live beyond the barriers that white privilege has created, this book offers readers a clear and honest confrontation with a trenchant and vexing concern.

Straight White Men

Author: Young Jean Lee

Publisher: Dramatists Play Service, Inc.

ISBN: 082223596X

Category: Drama

Page: 76

View: 5079

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When Ed and his three adult sons come together to celebrate Christmas, they enjoy cheerful trash-talking, pranks, and takeout Chinese. Then they confront a problem that even being a happy family can’t solve: When identity matters, and privilege is problematic, what is the value of being a straight white man?

What Does it Mean to be White?

Developing White Racial Literacy

Author: Robin J. DiAngelo

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN: 9781433111150

Category: Education

Page: 318

View: 2963

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What does it mean to be white in a society that proclaims race meaningless yet is deeply divided by race? In the face of pervasive racial inequality and segregation, most whites cannot answer that question. Robin DiAngelo argues that a number of factors make this question difficult for whites miseducation about what racism is; ideologies such as individualism and colorblindness; defensiveness; and a need to protect (rather than expand) our worldviews. These factors contribute to what she terms white racial illiteracy. Speaking as a white person to other white people, Dr. DiAngelo clearly and compellingly takes readers through an analysis of white socialization. She describes how race shapes the lives of white people, explains what makes racism so hard for whites to see, identifies common white racial patterns, and speaks back to popular white narratives that work to deny racism. Written as an accessible introduction to white identity from an anti-racist framework, <I>What Does It Mean To Be White? is an invaluable resource for members of diversity and anti-racism programs and study groups and students of sociology, psychology, education, and other disciplines.

White Innocence

Paradoxes of Colonialism and Race

Author: Gloria Wekker

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822374560

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 8338

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In White Innocence Gloria Wekker explores a central paradox of Dutch culture: the passionate denial of racial discrimination and colonial violence coexisting alongside aggressive racism and xenophobia. Accessing a cultural archive built over 400 years of Dutch colonial rule, Wekker fundamentally challenges Dutch racial exceptionalism by undermining the dominant narrative of the Netherlands as a "gentle" and "ethical" nation. Wekker analyzes the Dutch media's portrayal of black women and men, the failure to grasp race in the Dutch academy, contemporary conservative politics (including gay politicians espousing anti-immigrant rhetoric), and the controversy surrounding the folkloric character Black Pete, showing how the denial of racism and the expression of innocence safeguards white privilege. Wekker uncovers the postcolonial legacy of race and its role in shaping the white Dutch self, presenting the contested, persistent legacy of racism in the country.

Witnessing Whiteness

The Need to Talk About Race and How to Do It

Author: Shelly Tochluk

Publisher: R&L Education

ISBN: 1607092581

Category: Education

Page: 268

View: 2950

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Witnessing Whiteness invites readers to consider what it means to be white, describes and critiques strategies used to avoid race issues, and identifies the detrimental effect of avoiding race on cross-race collaborations. The author illustrates how racial discomfort leads white people toward poor relationships with people of color. Questioning the implications our history has for personal lives and social institutions, the book considers political, economic, socio-cultural, and legal histories that shaped the meanings associated with whiteness. For book discussion groups and workshop plans, please visit www.witnessingwhiteness.com.

The Dialectics of Citizenship

Exploring Privilege, Exclusion, and Racialization

Author: Bernd Reiter

Publisher: MSU Press

ISBN: 1628951621

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 9114

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What does it mean to be a citizen? What impact does an active democracy have on its citizenry and why does it fail or succeed in fulfilling its promises? Most modern democracies seem unable to deliver the goods that citizens expect; many politicians seem to have given up on representing the wants and needs of those who elected them and are keener on representing themselves and their financial backers. What will it take to bring democracy back to its original promise of rule by the people? Bernd Reiter’s timely analysis reaches back to ancient Greece and the Roman Republic in search of answers. It examines the European medieval city republics, revolutionary France, and contemporary Brazil, Portugal, and Colombia. Through an innovative exploration of country cases, this study demonstrates that those who stand to lose something from true democracy tend to oppose it, making the genealogy of citizenship concurrent with that of exclusion. More often than not, exclusion leads to racialization, stigmatizing the excluded to justify their non-membership. Each case allows for different insights into the process of how citizenship is upheld and challenged. Together, the cases reveal how exclusive rights are constituted by contrasting members to non-members who in that very process become racialized others. The book provides an opportunity to understand the dynamics that weaken democracy so that they can be successfully addressed and overcome in the future.

White Folks

Race and Identity in Rural America

Author: Timothy J Lensmire

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351719092

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 2512

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White Folks explores the experiences and stories of eight white people from a small farming community in northern Wisconsin. It examines how white people learn to be 'white' and reveals how white racial identity is dependent on people of color-even in situations where white people have little or no contact with racial others. Drawing on in-depth interviews with Delores, Frank, William, Erin, Robert, Libby, and Stan, as well as on his own experiences growing up in this same rural community, Lensmire creates a portrait of white people that highlights how their relations to people of color and their cultures are seldom simple and are characterized not just by fear and rejection, but also by attraction, envy, and desire. White Folks helps readers recognize the profound ambivalence that has characterized white thinking and feeling in relation to people of color for at least the last two hundred years. There is nothing smooth about the souls of white folks. Current antiracist work is often grounded in a white privilege framework that has proven ineffective - in part because it reduces white people to little more than the embodiment of privilege. Lensmire provides an alternative that confronts the violence at the core of white racial selves that has become increasingly visible in American society and politics, but that also illuminates conflicts and complexities there.

White Party, White Government

Race, Class, and U.S. Politics

Author: Joe R. Feagin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136332626

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 1574

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White Party, White Government examines the centuries-old impact of systemic racism on the U.S. political system. The text assesses the development by elite and other whites of a racialized capitalistic system, grounded early in slavery and land theft, and its intertwining with a distinctive political system whose fundamentals were laid down in the founding decades. From these years through the Civil War and Reconstruction, to the 1920s, the 1930s Roosevelt era, the 1960s Johnson era, through to the Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, and Barack Obama presidencies, Feagin exploring the effects of ongoing demographic changes on the present and future of the U.S. political system.

Anti-Racist Teaching

Author: Robert P. Amico

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317263642

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 9620

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"Antiracist Teaching" is about awakening students to their own humanity. In order to teach about this awakening one must be in the process of awakening oneself. The author shares personal anecdotes to illustrate the kinds of changes he experienced as a result of his antiracist teaching. His book explores the questions, Why is teaching about racism and white privilege to white students so difficult? and What can educators do to become more effective antiracist teachers for all of their students? Amico examines the cognitive and emotive obstacles that students experience in the classroom and argues that understanding these difficulties can lead to their resolution. He considers a variety of different approaches to antiracist teaching and endorses a dialogic approach. Dialogue is the centerpiece of students classroom experiences; students engage in dialogue at nearly every class meeting. The dialogic approach is effective in a variety of different learning settings from K 12 classrooms, trainings, retreats, workshops, and community organizations to the college classroom. Further, the book discusses how to bring antiracist teaching into the core of university curricula."

Good White People

The Problem with Middle-Class White Anti-Racism

Author: Shannon Sullivan

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438451687

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 8818

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Argues for the necessity of a new ethos for middle-class white anti-racism. Building on her book Revealing Whiteness, Shannon Sullivan identifies a constellation of attitudes common among well-meaning white liberals that she sums up as “white middle-class goodness,” an orientation she critiques for being more concerned with establishing anti-racist bona fides than with confronting systematic racism and privilege. Sullivan untangles the complex relationships between class and race in contemporary white identity and outlines four ways this orientation is expressed, each serving to establish one’s lack of racism: the denigration of lower-class white people as responsible for ongoing white racism, the demonization of antebellum slaveholders, an emphasis on colorblindness—especially in the context of white childrearing—and the cultivation of attitudes of white guilt, shame, and betrayal. To move beyond these distancing strategies, Sullivan argues, white people need a new ethos that acknowledges and transforms their whiteness in the pursuit of racial justice rather than seeking a self-righteous distance from it.