Dorothy Porter Wesley at Howard University

Building a Legacy of Black History

Author: Janet L. Sims-Wood

Publisher: History Press (SC)

ISBN: 9781626196445

Category: History

Page: 143

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"When Dorothy Burnett joined the library staff at Howard University in 1928, she was given a mandate to administer a library of Negro life and history. The school purchased the Arthur B. Spingarn Collection in 1946, along with other collections, and Burnett, who would later become Dorothy Porter Wesley, helped create a world-class archive known as the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center and cemented her place as an immensely important figure in the preservation of African American history. Wesley's zeal for unearthing materials related to African American history earned her the name of 'Shopping Bag Lady.' Join author, historian and former Howard University librarian Janet Sims-Wood as she charts the award-winning and distinguished career of an iconic archivist"--

Dorothy Porter Wesley at Howard University

Building a Legacy of Black History

Author: Janet Sims-Woods

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1625851790

Category: Social Science

Page: 144

View: 6852

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When Dorothy Burnett joined the library staff at Howard University in 1928, she was given a mandate to administer a library of Negro life and history. The school purchased the Arthur B. Spingarn Collection in 1946, along with other collections, and Burnett, who would later become Dorothy Porter Wesley, helped create a world-class archive known as the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center and cemented her place as an immensely important figure in the preservation of African American history. Wesley's zeal for unearthing materials related to African American history earned her the name of "Shopping Bag Lady." Join author, historian and former Howard University librarian Janet Sims-Wood as she charts the award-winning and distinguished career of an iconic archivist.

In Search of the Talented Tenth

Howard University Public Intellectuals and the Dilemmas of Race, 1926-1970

Author: Zachery R. Williams

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 0826272045

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

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From the 1920s through the 1970s, Howard University was home to America’s most renowned assemblage of black scholars. This book traces some of the personal and professional activities of this community of public intellectuals, demonstrating their scholar-activist nature and the myriad ways they influenced modern African American, African, and Africana policy studies. In Search of the Talented Tenth tells how individuals like Rayford Logan, E. Franklin Frazier, John Hope Franklin, Merze Tate, Charles Wesley, and Dorothy Porter left an indelible imprint on academia and black communities alike through their impact on civil rights, anticolonialism, and women’s rights. Zachery Williams explores W. E. B. Du Bois’s Talented Tenth by describing the role of public intellectuals from the Harlem Renaissance to the Black Power movement, in times as trying as the Jim Crow and Cold War eras. Williams first describes how the years 1890 to 1926 laid the foundation for Howard’s emergence as the “capstone of Negro education” during the administration of university president Mordecai Johnson. He offers a wide-ranging discussion of how the African American community of Washington, D.C., contributed to the dynamism and intellectual life of the university, and he delineates the ties that linked many faculty members to one another in ways that energized their intellectual growth and productivity as scholars. He also discusses the interaction of Howard’s intellectual community with those of the West Indies, Africa, and other places, showing the international impact of Howard’s intellectuals and the ways in which black and brown elites outside the United States stimulated the thought and scholarship of the Howard intellectuals. In Search of the Talented Tenth marks the first in-depth study of the intellectual activity of this community of scholars and further attests to the historic role of women faculty in shaping the university. It testifies to the impact of this group as a model against which the twenty-first century’s black public intellectuals can be measured.

The Bondwoman's Narrative

Author: Hannah Crafts

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

ISBN: 0759527644

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

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Possibly the first novel written by a black woman slave, this work is both a historically important literary event and a gripping autobiographical story in its own right.

Writing with Scissors

American Scrapbooks from the Civil War to the Harlem Renaissance

Author: Ellen Gruber Garvey

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199986355

Category: History

Page: 320

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Men and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks-the ancestors of Google and blogging. From Abraham Lincoln to Susan B. Anthony, African American janitors to farmwomen, abolitionists to Confederates, people cut out and pasted down their reading. Writing with Scissors opens a new window into the feelings and thoughts of ordinary and extraordinary Americans. Like us, nineteenth-century readers spoke back to the media, and treasured what mattered to them. In this groundbreaking book, Ellen Gruber Garvey reveals a previously unexplored layer of American popular culture, where the proliferating cheap press touched the lives of activists and mourning parents, and all who yearned for a place in history. Scrapbook makers documented their feelings about momentous public events such as living through the Civil War, mediated through the newspapers. African Americans and women's rights activists collected, concentrated, and critiqued accounts from a press that they did not control to create "unwritten histories" in books they wrote with scissors. Whether scrapbook makers pasted their clippings into blank books, sermon collections, or the pre-gummed scrapbook that Mark Twain invented, they claimed ownership of their reading. They created their own democratic archives. Writing with Scissors argues that people have long had a strong personal relationship to media. Like newspaper editors who enthusiastically "scissorized" and reprinted attractive items from other newspapers, scrapbook makers passed their reading along to family and community. This book explains how their scrapbooks underlie our present-day ways of thinking about information, news, and what we do with it.

White World Order, Black Power Politics

The Birth of American International Relations

Author: Robert Vitalis

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501701878

Category: History

Page: 288

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Racism and imperialism are the twin forces that propelled the course of the United States in the world in the early twentieth century and in turn affected the way that diplomatic history and international relations were taught and understood in the American academy. Evolutionary theory, social Darwinism, and racial anthropology had been dominant doctrines in international relations from its beginnings; racist attitudes informed research priorities and were embedded in newly formed professional organizations. In White World Order, Black Power Politics, Robert Vitalis recovers the arguments, texts, and institution building of an extraordinary group of professors at Howard University, including Alain Locke, Ralph Bunche, Rayford Logan, Eric Williams, and Merze Tate, who was the first black female professor of political science in the country. Within the rigidly segregated profession, the "Howard School of International Relations" represented the most important center of opposition to racism and the focal point for theorizing feasible alternatives to dependency and domination for Africans and African Americans through the early 1960s. Vitalis pairs the contributions of white and black scholars to reconstitute forgotten historical dialogues and show the critical role played by race in the formation of international relations.

The Negro in the United States

A Selected Bibliography

Author: Dorothy Porter Wesley,Dorothy Burnett Porter

Publisher: Omnigraphics Incorporated

ISBN: 9780780803121

Category: Social Science

Page: 313

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Identifies some 1,700 works about African Americans. Entries include full bibliographic information as well as Library of Congress call numbers and location in 11 major university libraries. Entries are arranged by subjects such as art, civil rights, folk tales, history, legal status, medicine, music, race relations, and regional studies. First published in 1970 by the Library of Congress.

Mary Mcleod Bethune in Florida

Bringing Social Justice to the Sunshine State

Author: Ashley N. Robertson

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1626199833

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 143

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Mary McLeod Bethune was often called the "First Lady of Negro America," but she made significant contributions to the political climate of Florida as well. From the founding of the Daytona Literary and Industrial School for Training Negro Girls in 1904, Bethune galvanized African American women for change. She created an environment in Daytona Beach that, despite racial tension throughout the state, allowed Jackie Robinson to begin his journey to integrating Major League Baseball less than two miles away from her school. Today, her legacy lives through a number of institutions, including Bethune-Cookman University and the Mary McLeod Bethune Foundation National Historic Landmark. Historian Ashley Robertson explores the life, leadership and amazing contributions of this dynamic activist.

Turner Station

Author: Jerome Watson

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439635617

Category: History

Page: 128

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In 1888, a passenger freight station was built by the Baltimore and Sparrows Point Railroad on land owned by Joshua J. Turner, a local businessman. The train stop was called Turner Station, and as the nearby community grew, it took on that name. The community's first church, St. Matthews Methodist Church, was founded in 1900, while the first public school, Turner Elementary School, was built in 1925. Adams Bar and Cocktail Lounge, an important entertainment establishment, came into being in 1933. It attracted top acts in African American music and comedy during the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, including Red Foxx, Pearl Bailey, and Fats Domino. Turner Station was home to individuals who made lasting contributions to the state and nation, including Dr. Joseph Thomas, physician, businessman, and diplomat; Kweisi Mfume, NAACP president; Calvin Hill, former NFL star; and Kevin Clash, puppeteer.

Erin and Iran

Cultural Encounters Between the Irish and the Iranians

Author: H. E. Chehabi,Professor of International Relations H E Chehabi,Emeritus Professor of French Grace Neville,Grace Neville

Publisher: Ilex Foundation

ISBN: 9780674088283

Category: History

Page: 215

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In "Erin and Iran, " North American and European scholars consider parallel themes in and interactions between Irish and Iranian cultures from ancient times to the twentieth century. These studies of mythology, literature, and travelogues constitute the first-ever volume dealing with cultural encounters between the Irish and the Iranians.

A Gullah Guide to Charleston

Walking Through Black History

Author: Alphonso Brown

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1614232679

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

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Join Alphonso Brown, owner and operator of Gullah Tours, Inc., on three accessible walking tours and a bonus driving tour through the places, history and lore relevant to the rich and varied contributions of black Charlestonians. Visit Denmark Vesey's home, Catfish Row, the Old Slave Mart and the Market; learn about the sweetgrass basket makers, the Aiken-Rhett House slave quarters, black slave owners and blacksmith Philip Simmons. Brown's distinctive narration, combined with detailed maps and vibrant descriptions in native Gullah, make this a unique and enjoyable way to experience the Holy City.

Washington, D. C.

1963-2006

Author: Tracey Gold Bennett

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738543833

Category: History

Page: 127

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By 1963, the African American community's demand for equality could not be ignored. Following the 1954 Supreme Court decision to desegregate schools, those who were oppressed took their place at lunch counters for sit-in demonstrations, participated in freedom rides, and refused to give up their seats on public buses. In August 1963, some 200,000 people converged on the nation's capital to heed Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s call for the country to change its policy of institutional discrimination. The photographs contained in Black America: Washington, D.C.: 1963-2006 chronicle that journey, from the struggle of the civil rights era to triumphs of African Americans in the most politically powerful city in the United States.

The African Diaspora

Author: Joseph E. Harris,Alusine Jalloh

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9780890967317

Category: History

Page: 152

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As Africans and descendants of slaves have sought to expand an understanding of their history, focus on the African diaspora--the global dispersal of a people and their culture--has increased. African studies have assumed a prominent place in historical scholarship, and a growing number of non-African scholars has helped revise a discipline established over several decades. The six contributions in this volume were compiled as a result of the thirtieth Walter Prescott Webb Memorial Lecture held at the University of Texas at Arlington. The contributors, nationally recognized in the field, represent a collaborative analysis of the African diaspora from African and non-African perspectives. Joseph E. Harris discusses how the African diaspora influences the economies, politics, and social dynamics of both the homeland and the host country. Alusine Jalloh reconstructs the mercantile activities of the Fula in colonial Sierra Leone. Joseph E. Inikori argues that slavery and serfdom in medieval Europe provide greater insights into precolonial Africa than do standard New World comparisons. Colin A. Palmer examines the power relationships that undergirded American slavery in order to better understand the enslaved. Douglas B. Chambers reveals the enduring influence of Africanisms in the historical development of Afro-Virginian slave culture. And Dale T. Graden looks at African slavery in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil between 1848 and 1856, focusing on the Bahian elite and their response to slave resistance.

Reclaiming the American Library Past

Writing the Women in

Author: Suzanne Hildenbrand

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9781567502336

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 324

View: 4147

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This solid anthology makes a fine start at the effort in its title, DEGREESIReclaiming the American Library Past: Writing the Women In DEGREESR. Like most good beginnings, it succeeds first by clarifying the status of the field and then by raising questions for subsequent scholars to ponder and pursue. - DEGREESIHistory of Education Quarterly DEGREESRThe essays in this book contribute along several dimensions to the new scholarship on a profession and public service of vital importance for well over a century to American literacy, culture and invention. Their authors add to the individual and collective biographies of women who have founded and administered diverse institutions and taught succeeding generations of librarians. The worksites of influential women such as Anne Carroll Moore, Josephine Rathbone, and Grace Hebard, like the nameless paid and volunteer staff who have served as unrecognized catalogers and children's librarians, have varied. They range from the pioneering libraries and library schools of the settled East- including Brooklyn and the Harlem, Times Square, and Morningside Heights neighborhoods of Manhattan- the historically Black Howard University to the numberless small towns of the West. They include the raw A&M colleges of Arkansas, Utah, New Mexico, and similarly neglected centers of local and regional enlight