Founders, Classics, Canons

Modern Disputes Over the Origins and Appraisal of Sociology's Heritage

Author: Peter Baehr

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351519336

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 2837

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Founders, classics, and canons have been vitally important in helping to frame sociology's identity. Within the academy today, a number of positions?feminist, postmodernist, postcolonial?question the status of "tradition."In Founders, Classics, Canons, Peter Baehr defends the continuing importance of sociology's classics and traditions in a university education. Baehr offers arguments against interpreting, defending, and attacking sociology's great texts and authors in terms of founders and canons. He demonstrates why, in logical and historical terms, discourses and traditions cannot actually be "founded" and why the term "founder" has little explanatory content. Equally, he takes issue with the notion of "canon" and argues that the analogy between the theological canon and sociological classic texts, though seductive, is mistaken.Although he questions the uses to which the concepts of founder, classic, and canon have been put, Baehr is not dismissive. On the contrary, he seeks to understand the value and meaning these concepts have for the people who employ them in the cultural battle to affirm or attack the liberal university tradition.

Order without Law

How Neighbors Settle Disputes

Author: Robert C. ELLICKSON,Robert C Ellickson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674036433

Category: Law

Page: 316

View: 6664

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Conflict in the Academy

A Study in the Sociology of Intellectuals

Author: M. Morgan,P. Baert

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137521309

Category: Social Science

Page: 96

View: 7778

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Examining an intramural conflict that erupted within the English Faculty at Cambridge University in the early 1980s, this book develops a theoretical analysis of disputes as they unfold within the academy and explores the broader historical shifts within Higher Education and how these related to developments in Continental Europe.

Classical Horizons

The Origins of Sociology in Ancient Greece

Author: George E. McCarthy

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791487624

Category: Social Science

Page: 212

View: 5900

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Argues that classical social theory has its intellectual and moral roots in classical Greece. Winner CHOICE 2003 Outstanding Academic Title “McCarthy’s ... erudition may very well render this work a contemporary classic in the continuing discussion of a maturing discipline.” — CHOICE

Theorizing Classical Sociology

Author: Professor Larry Ray,Ray

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)

ISBN: 0335232639

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 5604

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This authoritative text introduces the key issues of classical sociology to undergraduates, making use of student-friendly features such as clear summaries, further reading and a glossary. It explains how classical sociology emerged through a debate with the Enlightenment, in which the concept of the 'social' took shape.

The Complete Guide to Conflict Resolution in the Workplace

Author: Marick Francis Masters,Robert R. Albright

Publisher: AMACOM Div American Mgmt Assn

ISBN: 9780814406298

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 343

View: 3168

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In most areas of their lives, people thrive on conflict, yet in the workplace they try to steer clear. Conflict, though, is a healthy way to challenge the existing order and essential to change in the workplace. The real problem is not the conflict itself, but managing the conflict. This manual explains how to design a complete conflict resolution system and develop the skills to implement it. Filled with exercises, case studies and checklists the book also supplies an overview of workplace conflict; the tools for measuring it; and the techniques for resolving conflict. It covers such conflicts as: negotiation; labour-management partnerships; third-party disputes; mediation; and arbitration.

Understanding Classical Sociology

Marx, Weber, Durkheim

Author: John A Hughes,Wes Sharrock,Peter J Martin

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1446205258

Category: Social Science

Page: 246

View: 4354

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Praise for the First Edition: `Totally reliable... the authors have produced a book urgently needed by all those charged with introducing students to the classics... quite indispensable' - Times Higher Education Supplement This is a fully updated and expanded new edition of the successful undergraduate text. Providing a lucid examination of the pivotal theories of Marx, Durkheim and Weber, the authors submit that these figures have decisively shaped the discipline. They show how the classical apparatus is in use, even though it is being directed in new ways in response to the changing character of society. Written with the needs of undergraduates in mind, the text is essential reading for students in sociology and social theory.

Theorizing Classical Sociology

Author: Ray, Larry J

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)

ISBN: 0335198651

Category: Social Science

Page: 218

View: 8140

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* How did classical sociology emerge and take shape? * What is the significance of classical sociology for current theoretical debates? * How can the classical tradition in social theory inform our understanding of the crisis of modernity? Social theory has been formed through elaboration and critique of the classical tradition, and this introductory volume illuminates current theoretical terrain by examining major classical theories - of Saint-Simon, Comte, Marx, Durkheim, Dilthey, Tonnies, Simmel and Weber - highlighting recurring themes and debates. It explains how classical sociology emerged through a debate with the Enlightenment, in which the concept of the 'social' took shape. This was constructed around various themes emphasizing contrasting components of social life - including material, cultural, rational and moral factors. These divergent theorizations set the scene for the play of theoretical oppositions that characterize much subsequent theoretical dispute. Along with these debates there were questions about the very identity of sociology, which in turn relate to a core issue in the discipline - grasping the crisis of modernity. This authoritative text introduces the key issues of classical sociology to undergraduates, making use of student-friendly features such as clear summaries, further reading and a glossary. It lays the foundations for an understanding of contemporary discussion, and will also be recognized at the postgraduate level as a key reference in the field.

Alternative Dispute Resolution of Shareholder Disputes in Hong Kong

Institutionalizing Its Effective Use

Author: Ida Kwan Lun Mak

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108329314

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 702

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The landscape of shareholder dispute resolution in Hong Kong has changed vastly since the launch of the Civil Justice Reform in 2009. Key initiatives - the voluntary court-connected scheme and reform of the statutory unfair prejudice provisions - were employed to promote the greater use of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) in shareholder disputes. While the Hong Kong government and judiciary introduced such schemes to prove the legitimacy of extra-judicial over court-based litigation processes, their success is still uncertain. In this book, socio-legal theory and sociological institutionalism are used to develop a theoretical framework for analyzing the key stages of institutionalization. The author analyzes how procedural innovations could acquire legitimacy through different types of legal and non-legal inducement mechanisms within the institutionalization process. Recommendations on codifying and innovating ADR policy in Hong Kong shareholder disputes made with comparison to similar policies in the United Kingdom, South Africa and New Zealand.

Moral Time

Author: Donald Black

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199831609

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 8711

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Conflict is ubiquitous and inevitable, but people generally dislike it and try to prevent or avoid it as much as possible. So why do clashes of right and wrong occur? And why are some more serious than others? In Moral Time, sociologist Donald Black presents a new theory of conflict that provides answers to these and many other questions. The heart of the theory is a completely new concept of social time. Black claims that the root cause of conflict is the movement of social time, including relational, vertical, and cultural time--changes in intimacy, inequality, and diversity. The theory of moral time reveals the causes of conflict in all human relationships, from marital and other close relationships to those between strangers, ethnic groups, and entire societies. Moreover, the theory explains the origins and clash of right and wrong not only in modern societies but across the world and across history, from conflict concerning sexual behavior such as rape, adultery, and homosexuality, to bad manners and dislike in everyday life, theft and other crime, racism, anti-Semitism, anti-Americanism, witchcraft accusations, warfare, heresy, obscenity, creativity, and insanity. Black concludes by explaining the evolution of conflict and morality across human history, from the tribal to the modern age. He also provides surprising insights into the postmodern emergence of the right to happiness and the expanding rights of humans and non-humans across the world. Moral Time offers an incisive, powerful, and radically new understanding of human conflict--a fundamental and inescapable feature of social life.

A Conflict of Visions

Ideological Origins of Political Struggles

Author: Thomas Sowell

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465004660

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4079

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In this classic work, Thomas Sowell analyzes the two competing visions that shape our debates about the nature of reason, justice, equality, and power: the "constrained” vision, which sees human nature as unchanging and selfish, and the "unconstrained” vision, in which human nature is malleable and perfectible. He describes how these two radically opposed views have manifested themselves in the political controversies of the past two centuries, including such contemporary issues as welfare reform, social justice, and crime. Updated to include sweeping political changes since its first publication in 1987, this revised edition of A Conflict of Visions offers a convincing case that ethical and policy disputes circle around the disparity between both outlooks.

Culture and Society

Contemporary Debates

Author: Jeffrey C. Alexander,Steven Seidman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521359399

Category: Social Science

Page: 375

View: 4581

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This volume brings together the major statements by the leading contemporary scholars of cultural analysis on the relation between culture and society. Part One surveys the range of current analytical debate over culture, focusing on the relationship of culture to social structure and power. While individual contributions differ in defining the nature of culture and its relation to society, they are in agreement in assessing the relative autonomy of culture and the centrality of symbolic analysis. Part Two turns to substantive debates, including those over the role of religion, secular ideology, and mass culture and brings to light disputes about the meaning of modernity. The book testifies to the remarkable development in the past two decades of a cultural paradigm for social and political analysis.

Family and Kinship in East London

Author: Michael Young,Peter Wilmott

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136626166

Category: Social Science

Page: 268

View: 2850

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First published in 1957 ,and reprinted with a new introduction in 1986, Michael Young and Peter Willmott’s book on family and kinship in Bethnal Green in the 1950s is a classic in urban studies. A standard text in planning, housing, family studies and sociology, it predicted the failure in social terms of the great rehousing campaign which was getting under way in the 1950s. The tall flats built to replace the old ‘slum’ houses were unpopular. Social networks were broken up. The book had an immediate impact when it appeared – extracts were published in the newspapers, the sales were a record for a report of a sociological study, Government ministers quoted it. But the approach it advocated was not accepted until the late 1960s, and by then it was too late. This Routledge Revivals reissue includes the authors' introduction from the 1986 reissue, reviewing the impact of the book and its ideas thirty years on. They argue that if the lessons implicit in the book had been learned in the 1950s, London and other British cities might not have suffered the 'anomie' and violence manifested in the urban riots of the 1980s.

Object Relations in Psychoanalytic Theory

Author: Jay Greenberg

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674416996

Category: Psychology

Page: 456

View: 9922

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Object Relations in Psychoanalytic Theory offers a conceptual map of the most difficult terrain in psychoanalysis as well as a history of its most complex disputes. In exploring the counterpoint between different psychoanalytic traditions, it provides a synthetic perspective that is a major contribution to psychoanalytic thought. The focal point of clinical psychoanalysis has always been the patient’s relationships with others. How do these relationships come about? How do they operate? How are they transformed? How are relationships with others to be understood within the framework of psychoanalytic theory? Jay Greenberg and Stephen Mitchell argue that there have been two basic solutions to the problem of locating relationships within psychoanalytic theory: the drive model, in which relations with others are generated and shaped by the need for drive gratification; and various relational models, in which relationships themselves are taken as primary and irreducible. The authors provide a masterful overview of the history of psychoanalytic ideas, in which they trace the divergences and the interplay between the two models and the intricate strategies adopted by the major theorists in their efforts to position themselves with respect to these models. They demonstrate further that many of the controversies and fashions in diagnosis and psychoanalytic technique can be fully understood only in the context of the dialectic between the drive model and the relational models.

The Rise of Victimhood Culture

Microaggressions, Safe Spaces, and the New Culture Wars

Author: Bradley Campbell,Jason Manning

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319703293

Category: Social Science

Page: 278

View: 6086

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The Rise of Victimhood Culture offers a framework for understanding recent moral conflicts at U.S. universities, which have bled into society at large. These are not the familiar clashes between liberals and conservatives or the religious and the secular: instead, they are clashes between a new moral culture—victimhood culture—and a more traditional culture of dignity. Even as students increasingly demand trigger warnings and “safe spaces,” many young people are quick to police the words and deeds of others, who in turn claim that political correctness has run amok. Interestingly, members of both camps often consider themselves victims of the other. In tracking the rise of victimhood culture, Bradley Campbell and Jason Manning help to decode an often dizzying cultural milieu, from campus riots over conservative speakers and debates around free speech to the election of Donald Trump.

Approaches and Methodologies in the Social Sciences

A Pluralist Perspective

Author: Donatella Della Porta,Michael Keating

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139474596

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 7332

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A revolutionary textbook introducing masters and doctoral students to the major research approaches and methodologies in the social sciences. Written by an outstanding set of scholars, and derived from successful course teaching, this volume will empower students to choose their own approach to research, to justify this approach, and to situate it within the discipline. It addresses questions of ontology, epistemology and philosophy of social science, and proceeds to issues of methodology and research design essential for producing a good research proposal. It also introduces researchers to the main issues of debate and contention in the methodology of social sciences, identifying commonalities, historic continuities and genuine differences.

Weber's Rationalism and Modern Society

New Translations on Politics, Bureaucracy, and Social Stratification

Author: N.A

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137365862

Category: Social Science

Page: 233

View: 9218

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Weber's Rationalism and Modern Society rediscovers Max Weber for the twenty-first century. Tony and Dagmar Waters' translation of Weber's works highlights his contributions to the social sciences and politics, credited with highlighting concepts such as "iron cage," "bureaucracy," "bureaucratization," "rationalization," "charisma," and the role of the "work ethic" in ordering modern labor markets. Outlining the relationship between community (Gemeinschaft), and market society (Gesellschaft), the issues of social stratification, power, politics, and modernity resonate just as loudly today as they did for Weber during the early twentieth century.

Remaking the Godly Marriage

Gender Negotiation in Evangelical Families

Author: John P. Bartkowski

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813529196

Category: Religion

Page: 205

View: 4389

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While religious leaders often have enormous influence over their members' beliefs and how they translate their beliefs into action in everyday life, the individual family remains the place where religious values are practiced through and ultimately transferred to the next generation. As such, the family is an extremely important, though frequently overlooked, topic of study for sociologists of religion. In Remaking the Godly Marriage, John Bartkowski studies evangelical Protestants and their views on marriage and gender relations and how they are lived within individual families. The author compares elite evangelical prescriptions for godly family living with the day-to-day practices in conservative Protestant households. He asks: How serious are the debates over gender and the family that are manifested within contemporary evangelicalism? What are the values that underlie this debate? Have these internecine disputes been altered by the emergence of new evangelical movements such as biblical feminism and the Promise Keepers? And given the fact that leading evangelicals advance competing visions of godly family life, how do conservative religious spouses make sense of their own family relationships and gender identities? Through in-depth interviews with evangelical married couples and an exhaustive study of evangelical family advice manuals, Bartkowski explores the disputes and ambivalence concerning traditional gender roles and patriarchal models of family life, which derive from the tension between evangelical Protestantism as a religious subculture and the broader American secular culture in which it is embedded. Bartkowski reveals how evangelical men and women jointly negotiate gender roles within their families and selectively appropriate values of the larger culture even as they attempt to cope with the conflicting messages of their own faith.